bipedalism

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bipedalism

a mode of locomotion found in many primates (particularly man) and birds, in which only the hind limbs are used in walking. True bipedalism (i.e. where locomotion is normally bipedal) has required evolutionary changes to the vertebral column and pelvis, with their associated musculature. A principal advantage of bipedalism would seem to be that the forelimbs can become modified for a nonwalking function, e.g. tool handling in man, flight in birds.
References in periodicals archive ?
This hypothesis is not reliable enough to move the adoption of bipedal locomotion so far back in time.
It is unknown what selection pressure favored bipedal locomotion. Some authors relate it to the beginning of humanity's unusual monogamy.
The lower spine serves as a good basis for testing the habitual bipedal locomotion hypothesis because human lumbar vertebrae and sacra exhibit distinct features that facilitate the transmission of body weight for habitual bipedalism, says Russo.
The constructal-law direction is from long to tall, and this too agrees with the evolution of animal locomotion: bipedal locomotion evolved after quadrupedal locomotion.
Kohlsdorf et al., 2004), particularly regarding bipedal locomotion.
As this bipedal locomotion is probably not an ancestral trait for lacertilians, parallel evolution must have occurred (Aerts et al., 2003).
Kohlsdorf and Biewener (2006), for example, observed bipedal locomotion when lizards moved over medium and high obstacles, which could be related to an enhancement in environmental perception.
In this paper, we describe, for the first time, bipedal locomotion in South American lizards.
Yet still there seems to be no correlation between tail angles and bipedal locomotion (Irschick and Jayne, 1999).
Talia Moore headed research at Harvard University analysed jerboas' bipedal locomotion.
Claudine Cohen, science historian at Paris' Higher School of Social Sciences said: "The gluteal muscles are unique to humans, enabling bipedal locomotion - on two feet.