biological warfare

(redirected from Bioweapons)
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A hypothetical military technique that could be used by either nations or non-governmental bodies—e.g., the use of pathogens—viruses, bacteria, other disease-causing biological agents, or the toxins produced by them as biological weapons

biological warfare

,

BW

Warfare in which disease-producing microorganisms, toxins, or organic biocides, e.g., Bacillus anththracis or Yersinia pestis are deliberately used to destroy, injure, or immobilize livestock, vegetation, or human life, as by causing diseases, e.g., anthrax or plague.
Synonym: biowar See: chemical warfare

biological warfare

The use of micro-organisms capable of spreading and causing epidemics of disease, for military purposes.

biological warfare

the use of living organisms, particularly microorganisms, or their products, to induce illness or death in a population.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is some apprehension about the potential for its conversion into a bioweapon by a terrorist group.
The BND knew in 2000 that I was lying after they talked to my former boss, Dr Bassil Latif, who told them there were no mobile bioweapons factories.
Bioweapons threaten thousands of casualties in addition to other disastrous long-term consequences.
The article's underlying assumptions are twofold: (1) bioweapons are essentially "unjust" weapons by virtue of their inability to adhere to Just War concepts of proportionality, restraint, and respect for noncombatants; and (2) all weapons systems are subject to the vengeful excesses of their users.
building a bioweapons plant from commercially available materials to prove "terrorists" can do it;
programs arouse suspicion, undermine the treaty, and could stimulate a new bioweapons arms race.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2001), the four categories of bioweapons are as follows: (a) bacteria such as plague, anthrax, and tularemia; (b) viruses such as smallpox and viral hemorrhagic fevers; (c) rickettsias such as Q fever; and (d) toxins such as botulinum, ricin, and mycotoxins.
A dramatic increase in classified threat-assessment research is imminent, including the exploration of potential new bioweapons agents and technologies.
Still other scientists are using data from the human genome project to protect us against bioweapons.
He will not revel in actions such as Bolton's needless attacks on the United Nations and sabotaging of its 2001 bioweapons conference.
21 that while the Castro regime has sophisticated technology, there's no evidence to support claims it's working on bioweapons.
Regis notes that since President Richard Nixon terminated the United States' bioweapons program the country has not produced any more bioweapons.