biological warfare

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A hypothetical military technique that could be used by either nations or non-governmental bodies—e.g., the use of pathogens—viruses, bacteria, other disease-causing biological agents, or the toxins produced by them as biological weapons

biological warfare

,

BW

Warfare in which disease-producing microorganisms, toxins, or organic biocides, e.g., Bacillus anththracis or Yersinia pestis are deliberately used to destroy, injure, or immobilize livestock, vegetation, or human life, as by causing diseases, e.g., anthrax or plague.
Synonym: biowar See: chemical warfare

biological warfare

The use of micro-organisms capable of spreading and causing epidemics of disease, for military purposes.

biological warfare

the use of living organisms, particularly microorganisms, or their products, to induce illness or death in a population.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Cutting-edge artificial intelligence tools like DataVoyant can simultaneously harvest, curate and make sense of unstructured big data; in this case identifying North Korean activities for potentially acquiring bioweapons knowledge.
Types of Bioweapons: There are seven types of biological agents:
(1) In addition to the innate fear that the deadly virus inspires, a further fear stems from questions about Ebola's potential use as a bioweapon. Ebola is not a new disease.
That claim was proven false, and Latif strongly denied Janabi's claim of mobile bioweapons trucks and another allegation that 12 people had died during an accident at a secret bioweapons facility in southeast Baghdad.
There is no way a typical "white world" scientist can penetrate the biotechnology capacities of a deep-black Level 4 bioweapons lab in the US--or in China or Russia for that matter.
The formal Protocol for the Prohibition of the Use in War of Asphyxiating, Poisonous, or Other Gases, and of Bacteriological Methods of Warfare (Geneva Protocol) did not restrict biological weapons research programs, nor did it bar the development and stockpiling of bioweapons. Furthermore, states that signed and/or ratified the Protocol insisted on maintaining a right to retaliate in-kind if they were attacked with biological or chemical weapons.
The authors, a biotechnology expert and a science journalist, support their positions with detailed descriptions of potential bioweapons such as anthrax or botulism and what it would take to weaponize them.
"Each of the last three administrations has been slow to recognize and respond to the biothreat, but we no longer have the luxury of a slow learning curve when we know al-Qaeda is interested in bioweapons" The Washington Post quoted Bob Graham, former senator who co-chaired the panel along with former senator James M.
"There is much evidence suggesting terrorists are likely to use bioweapons. Its sheer potential to affect millions itself mandates preparedness," he stressed.
Accordingly, I submit that the heightened risk of bioweapons' use as an instrument of twenty-first-century terrorist warfare is a significant hermeneutic through which to explore shifts in the contemporary Zeitgeist.
Topping the list at $2B is point-of-care clinical settings, followed by clinical research and trials, and military and bioweapons at $500M each.
Were a bioweapons attack to be directed against the nation by a determined network of foreign terrorists, time would be of the essence.