biodiversity

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Related to Bioversity: IPGRI

biodiversity

(bī′ō-dĭ-vûr′sĭ-tē)
n.
1. The number and variety of species found within a specified geographic region.
2. The variability among living organisms on the earth, including the variability within and between species and within and between ecosystems.

biodiversity

The existence of complex flora and fauna in an ecosystem; the genetic diversity of natural organisms. Biodiversity increases the overall productivity of a plot of land, and maximises its resistance to disturbances—e.g., drought. In prairie ecosystems stressed by drought, recovery to a normal state of productivity was more rapid in experimental plots of vegetation with the greatest biodiversity, a finding that supports the need to maintain biodiversity.

Loss of biodiversity—i.e., a reduction in the number of species, subspecies and strains—will be disastrous for the planet's ecosystem. An example would be growing a crop food, e.g., corn or rice, from only one highly productive, rapid-growing, spoil-resistant strain—while seemingly having all the desirable features, if the strain became susceptible to a particular pathogen, all those dependent on the crop could face famine.

Marine biodiversity may be in a state of ecological crisis due to coastal development—e.g., destruction of estuaries, motorised marine vessels, ocean dumping, oil spills, overfishing with trawling of the ocean floor and subsequent disruption of bottom communities and coral reefs, overwhaling, pollutant runoffs, and toxic tides due to eutrophication.

biodiversity

see DIVERSITY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Molina as a Bioversity coordinator in the Asia Pacific, had to negotiate with the Taiwan Banana Research Institute to share their selections of tissue culture variants that they had used to solve their TR4 Fusarium Wilt problem.
The researchers will be presenting their work at the national university technology showcase event, Bioversity.
When he came back to the Philippines in 1995, he was tapped by Bioversity International, an NGO focused on bananas, to be the agency's regional coordinator for Asia and the Pacific.
Co-organized by the Indian Society of Plant Genetic Resources and Bioversity International, a CGIAR Research Center headquartered in Rome, Italy, International Agrobiodiversity Congress received support from many Indian and international organisations engaged in the conservation and use of genetic resources.
Na caracterizacao morfoagronomica dos acessos, levando-se em conta o potencial ornamental, tomou-se como base os descritores estabelecidos pelo Internacional Plant Genetic Resources Institute para o genero Capsicum (IPGRI, 1995), atualmente Bioversity International, e os padroes de qualidade estabelecidos pelo Instituto Brasileiro de Floricultura (IBRAFLOR, 2011), quanto aos criterios de classificacao para pimentas ornamentais no Brasil relacionados a seguir: forma da folha, habito de crescimento da planta, antocianina no no da planta, posicao da flor, cor da corola, cor do fruto no estado intermediario e maduro, forma do fruto, forma do apice do fruto, textura da epiderme do fruto, comprimento do fruto, comprimento do pedicelo, persistencia do fruto maduro e altura da planta.
5) Researcher at Bioversity International, Location Costa Rica, Industry Nonprofit Organization.
Partnering with an indigenous community organization, the Union of Indigenous and Peasant Communities (UNORCAC); Bioversity International, an international organization with a mandate to advance conservation and use of genetic diversity worldwide; and the Ecuadorian National Agricultural Research Institute (INIAP), ARS's equivalent in Ecuador, Williams helped set up and now advises a program designed to promote conservation and increase use of local crops in the area.
Research programs for provitamin A bananas are based at Bioversity International and IITA.
Executing Agency The Ministry of Nature Protection of the Republic of Armenia, The Armenian National Agrarian University, Bioversity International, Rome, Italy
We also thank the World Agroforestry Center, Bioversity International, and the Center for International Forestry Research for the funding and support through the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry that made this analysis possible; and Cornell University for ongoing access to their marvelous libraries.