Bioengineered Food

(redirected from Biotech Food)
Any food genetically modified to resist or tolerate pesiticides, insects, or viruses, or to decrease spoilage, produce antibodies, decrease fatty acid synthesis, or increase production of certain amino acids

food

Any material, including water, that provides the nutritive requirements of an organism to maintain growth and physical well-being. For humans, food includes carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, and minerals. See: carbohydrate; digestion; fat(2); nutrition; protein; stomach

bioengineered food

Genetically modified food.

food chain

See: chain

contamination of food

The presence, introduction, or development of infectious or toxic material in food. Food may be contaminated by chemical residues (such as pesticides), bacteria (Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Listeria), viruses (hepatitis A, Norwalk), protozoa (Giardia), worms (tapeworms and roundworms), molds (Aspergillus), or toxins (botulinum, staphylococcal enterotoxin).

convenience food

Food in which one or more steps in preparation have been completed before the product is offered for retail sale. Examples include frozen vegetables, bake mixes, heat-and-serve foods, and ready-to-eat foods.

dietetic food

Food in which the nutrient content has been modified for use in special diets, esp. for diabetics.

enriched food

A processed food that has lost nutrients during milling, grinding, pasteurization, or other processes and then had those nutrients added back to the marketed product. Two examples of vitamins commonly used in food enrichment are vitamins B1 and B2, thiamine and riboflavin, respectively.

fast food

Commercially available, ready-to-eat meals (such as hamburgers, hot dogs, pizza, fried chicken, or french fries) with a high fat content, little fiber, and minimal quantities of vitamins or calcium.

functional food

1. Food products with additives for which, following FDA approval, health claims can be made.
2. A food that has a defined health benefit for the person who consumes it.

genetically modified food

Any crop or agricultural product altered by biological engineering for drought resistance, increased growth, resistance to pests or pesticides, prolonged shelf-life, altered textures or flavors, or other economically or commercially desirable characteristics. Promoters of genetically modified foods point to their improved yields (which may have a beneficial impact on agricultural profits or world hunger). Opponents of genetic modification have raised concerns about its effects on ecosystems, human food allergies, and religious dietary laws.
Synonym: bioengineered food

junk food

A colloquial term for food that has limited nutritional value. Typically it refers to foods high in salt, sugar, fat, or calories with low nutrient content. These include most salted snack foods, candy, gum, most sweet desserts, fried fast food, and carbonated beverages.

medical food

A food formulated by the selective use of nutrients and manufactured for the dietary treatment of a specific condition or disease.

novel food

A nutritional source that has not been used in the past or one that has been made by a new manufacturing process, including, e.g., genetic modification.

organic food

A crop or animal product cultivated with specific guidelines that limit the use of petrochemicals, radiation, or genetically engineered technologies in its agriculture.

processed food

Raw food that has been adulterated or modified to increase its nutritional content or make it more palatable and easier to ship, to store, or to sell.

ready-to-use therapeutic food

Abbreviation: RUTF
A nutritional supplement consisting of a roasted, ground cereal and a roasted, ground legume, fortified with vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients. The cereal provides a source of carbohydrates; the legume, a source of protein. RUTFs are used to treat and prevent malnutrition in impoverished populations, esp. undernourished children.

risky food

Any food that is contaminated or more likely than most other foods to be contaminated with bacteria, carcinogens, or toxins.

textured food

Food products manufactured from various nutritional components made to resemble conventional protein-source foods in texture such as meat, seafood, or poultry.
References in periodicals archive ?
China's global leadership in approving biotech rice and maize will likely become a positive role model and influence acceptance and speed of biotech food and feed crop adoption throughout Asia and globally," James added.
Bt brinjal (eggplant) is the next biotech crop being considered for approval, and would be India's first biotech food crop.
In April the EU lifted a six-year moratorium on new biotech food, but just barely.
In regard to risk attitude (SAFE_1) we expect that if consumers are risk averse about food choices, they would pay a higher premium to avoid biotech food products.
Slow donations, poor infrastructure, and concerns about biotech food were major obstacles to an effective response.
It is that disconnect that is helping fuel the growth of the biotech food industry.
The FDA is much too busy protecting the profits of the biotech food companies," says Representative Dennis Kucinich, Democrat of Ohio.
food companies say that despite European opposition to biotech food and crops, U.
If manufacturers of GE-free food do not label under the FDA's proposal, then consumers will remain ignorant of whether and when they are ingesting biotech food.
Europeans argue that the possible environmental and health consequences of biotech food, while not yet satisfactorily demonstrated, remain potentially devastating to European humans and European ecology.
Tom Harkin, an Iowa Democrat, has spearheaded the congressional criticism against the EU in biotech food trade.