biosemiotics

(redirected from Biosemiotic)

biosemiotics

An interdisciplinary science that studies communication and signalling in living systems.
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References in periodicals archive ?
calls these contact zones "ecotones," defined as biosemiotic
For example, the "biosemiotic project," as introduced by Jesper Hoffmeyer, is premised on the assumption that "cultural sign processes must be regarded as special instances of a more general and extensive biosemiosis that continuously unfolds and acts in the biosphere." (27) According to this view, the very existence of signs and the constitution of meaning does not separate the world of culture from the life of nature but includes each of them in the other.
The answer lies neither in the tick nor in the mammal, but in the way the tick selects and interprets many signs given by the mammal, that is, in their biosemiotic exchanges.
Throughout the book Wheeler seeks to re-emphasise the historical core of biosemiotic identity, pointing out new and overlooked connections between and to Peircean semiotics of meaning within biosemiotics' origin story.
These reflections from Hominescence (2001) in addition to the above epitextual comments are clearly a reflection of a biosemiotic view of communication.
Registering such nonhuman appeals via a form of "biosemiotic attention" (108), these writers integrate into their work "the force of nonlinguistic meaning, be it avian song or insect noise, the lowing of cattle or the dying stag's groans" (122), ultimately revealing a "reflexive incorporation of the nonlinguistic, affective communicativity humans share with other creatures" (204).
be illuminated by an integrating framework that draws together insights of evolutionary, biosemiotic, complexity-theoretic, and umwelt-theoretic approaches.
In "The Systemic Approach, Biosemiotic Theory, and Ecocide in Australia"
Al disrupts biological self-ordering, energy transduction, and signaling systems, thus increasing biosemiotic entropy.
The understanding that all living systems are semiotic allows us to understand more clearly that human semiosis--natural in scents and some expressions, gestures and symptoms, naturo-cultural in other gestures and symptoms, verbal and nonverbal in culture--is an evolutionary development from biosemiotic nature.
While a lot of Cohen's argument concerns the divided heritage of deconstruction, something of probably little immediate interest to environmental critics, a crucial move in his reading of de Man is a suggestive, if arguably under-examined, engagement with biosemiotics. In effect, the biosemiotic insight that "signs are not added onto the bios, but rather that the latter emerges with and from mnemosemiotic process and formalizations" (Cohen 2011, 110) lends support to a reading of the intensifying human degradation of the biosphere, and accompanying modes of denial and false consciousness, in terms derived from de Man's own radical engagements with semiosis.
Among the topics are biology is immature biosemiotics, the semiotics of emergent levels of life, a biosemiotic perspective on the multitrophic plant-herbivore-parasitoid-pathogen system, semiosphere is the relational biosphere, and a roundtable on (mis)understanding of biosemiotics.