bioresonance therapy


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bioresonance therapy

Pseudomedicine
A pseudoscientific form of electromagnetic therapy based on the largely discredited “school” of radionics introduced in the US in the 1920s, for which there was no scientific basis then, nor is there now. The device allegedly measures skin-resistance, like Scientology’s E-Meter; the current format claims to cure allergies, sleep disorders, chronic pain, cigarette smoking, chronic fatigue syndrome, hormonal dysfunction, psychosoomatic disease, etc.

There are no data in peer-reviewed literature that suggest that this therapy provides any benefit whatsoever.
References in periodicals archive ?
Personalized treatments involving nutrition, acid-base balance, oxidation, specific nutrients, herbal therapies, homeopathics, isopathics, and bioresonance therapy were discussed.
Aside from homeopathy, homotoxicology (removal of toxins in the body tissues), chelation therapy (cleansing the body), oxygen therapy, neural therapy to treat chronic pain, and mesotherapy to treat rheumatism, infectious diseases and vascular diseases, Francisco's EWBHC also offers orthomolecular medicine, nutritional supplements, enzyme therapy, traditional Chinese acupuncture and moxibustion, bioresonance therapy, live-cell analysis, antiaging therapy and skin-rejuvenation therapy.
For example, in Germany, a decision of the Federal Constitutional Court challenged an evidence-based reimbursement decision when a nineteen-year-old patient suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy requested coverage of bioresonance therapy, an unproven treatment that uses electrical signals.
Bahrain-based Dutch therapists Dr Maya Lok and her son Stephane say they have used bioresonance therapy to successfully treat patients who are suffering from allergies, back pain, eczema, asthma, migraines and many other conditions.
Bicom bioresonance therapy works on the idea that every cell and body part, as well as viruses, pollen, toxins and bacteria, has a specific wavelength or frequency.
Melanie, 46, lives with husband Jeffrey, was very sceptical when she heard about Joseph Price and his bioresonance therapy clinic from an acupuncturist treating her for an unrelated groin injury.
The technique harnesses principles from quantum physics and Joseph, dad to Jacob, seven, Louis, six and Freya, three, explains: "Bioresonance therapy is like a tuning fork tuning an instrument.
Bioresonance therapy is a therapeutical method, which relies on the EM oscillations of the patient's body to ensure his recovery.
Includes basic training on application of MORA and BioResonance Therapy with practical application of diagnostic and med-testing techniques.
Louise Courtier, 36, is one of the first people in the UK to offer a new treatment - Bioresonance therapy.
A spokeswoman for anti-smoking group ASH Wales said: 'Clinically unproven methods which people use to help them stop smoking need to be viewed with caution.' HOW IT WORKS: Invented by a German doctor in the 1970s, Bioresonance therapy is common in many continental countries.
Islamov and colleagues report, "Changes in the lymphocyte antioxidant system indicate that bioresonance therapy activates nonspecific protective mechanism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis." A 2006 German placebo-controlled study found that "[t]he MORA bioresonance therapy can markedly improve non-organic gastro-intestinal complaints." (Bioresonance uses frequency to lesson or cancel dysfunctional frequencies emitted by the body or organisms in the body.) If energy medicine is simply a matter of the placebo effect, why did the "main outcome parameters" in this study's control group respond "only slightly" when the active group show marked improvement?