bioresonance therapy

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bioresonance therapy

Pseudomedicine
A pseudoscientific form of electromagnetic therapy based on the largely discredited “school” of radionics introduced in the US in the 1920s, for which there was no scientific basis then, nor is there now. The device allegedly measures skin-resistance, like Scientology’s E-Meter; the current format claims to cure allergies, sleep disorders, chronic pain, cigarette smoking, chronic fatigue syndrome, hormonal dysfunction, psychosoomatic disease, etc.

There are no data in peer-reviewed literature that suggest that this therapy provides any benefit whatsoever.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
After observing their corresponding partial benefits, limitations, and aggravations on himself and his patients, he resorted to bioresonance testing and causative homeopathy, based on relevant knowledge from physics and toxicology to optimize benefits and safety of the detoxification.
* Vital Analyses based on newest bioresonance technolgy from Russian and American Space program delivering more than 220 accurate scores
Aside from homeopathy, homotoxicology (removal of toxins in the body tissues), chelation therapy (cleansing the body), oxygen therapy, neural therapy to treat chronic pain, and mesotherapy to treat rheumatism, infectious diseases and vascular diseases, Francisco's EWBHC also offers orthomolecular medicine, nutritional supplements, enzyme therapy, traditional Chinese acupuncture and moxibustion, bioresonance therapy, live-cell analysis, antiaging therapy and skin-rejuvenation therapy.
Caroline Mitchell Look at bioresonance testing as it can pick up all sorts of infections, viruses and bacteria that modern western medicine fails to detect.
The naturopathic practitioners offered a broad range of treatment methods from para-medicinal treatment such as bioresonance therapy or iris diagnosis to classic natural remedy methods such as phytotherapy or balanced nutrition [9].
[23] Complementary and alternative medicine refers to the phytotherapies (Chinese herbal medicines, Japanese herbal medicines (Kampo), siddha/ayurveda, tea tree oil and essential fatty acids), homoeopathy, complementary psychotherapy (hypnosis, biofeedback, stress management), acupuncture, bioresonance treatment, balneotherapy, cleansing of the colon with enemas, massage therapy, autologous blood therapy, Reiki and topical streptococcal application.
Dr Salim was instrumental in the opening of the first bioresonance clinic in the Middle East in 2002.
For example, in Germany, a decision of the Federal Constitutional Court challenged an evidence-based reimbursement decision when a nineteen-year-old patient suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy requested coverage of bioresonance therapy, an unproven treatment that uses electrical signals.
Bahrain-based Dutch therapists Dr Maya Lok and her son Stephane say they have used bioresonance therapy to successfully treat patients who are suffering from allergies, back pain, eczema, asthma, migraines and many other conditions.