biopsychosocial model


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bi·o·psy·cho·social mod·el

a conceptual model that assumes that psychological and social factors must also be included along with the biologic in understanding a person's medical illness or disorder.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biopsychosocial model

A theoretical framework that posits that biological, psychological and social factors all play a significant role in human disease or illness and health, rather than biology alone.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·psy·cho·so·cial mod·el

(bī'ō-sī'kō-sō'shăl mod'ĕl)
A conceptual model that assumes that psychological and social factors must also be included along with the biologic in understanding a person's medical illness or disorder.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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The scientific literature highlights the importance of the biopsychosocial model in the approach of LBP in the general population (17-20).
The Gap: Introduction of the Biopsychosocial Model in Occupational Therapy
The biomedical model positing the body as machine, comprised of component parts treatable in isolation from one another, dominates medicine, while the more holistic biopsychosocial model, which takes into account the body, mind and social determinants, structures policy provision.
The role that current health sciences students will one day have to play in protecting patients from being treated unjustly relies heavily upon the biopsychosocial model for the assessment, prevention and treatment of disease, as well as on patient advocacy.
The biopsychosocial model of addiction states that genetic/biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors contribute to substance consumption and should be taken into account for its prevention and treatment (Becona, 2002; Skewes & Gonzalez, 2013).
In recent past, the definition of disability has encompassed biopsychosocial model and have taken into account the two-way association between a health condition and contextual factors, i.e., personal and environmental2.
The substance abuse among people with ID has often been explained by a biopsychosocial model. This model is based on the complex interplay between biological, psychological and social factors (van Duijvenbode et al., 2015).
We dedicated two half-days a week concurrently, seeing a range of inpatients and applying the biopsychosocial model to pain assessment and intervention.
It should also be noted that the presupposition that genes interact with the environment also underpins the biopsychosocial model as proposed by Engel (1977).
In addition, RT practitioners do not strictly adhere to the medical model, but follow a biopsychosocial model that is developmental in nature and focuses on strengths and interests.
(11.) The biopsychosocial model is a way of understanding an individual's subjective experience as an essential contributor to accurate diagnosis, health outcomes, and clinical care.
One important model, which is consistent with the prevailing philosophies of rehabilitation, and that continues to gain empirical support as an EBP in the rehabilitation literature is the biopsychosocial model.