biopolymer

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bi·o·pol·y·mer

(bī'ō-pol'ē-mer),
A naturally occurring compound that is a polymer containing identical or similar subunits.

biopolymer

(bī′ō-pŏl′ə-mər)
n.
A macromolecule in a living organism that is formed by linking together several smaller molecules, as a protein from amino acids or DNA from nucleotides.

biopolymer

Any biomacromolecule found within a living thing, which consists of monomeric units covalently bonded to form larger units—e.g., proteins and peptides are (bio)polymers of amino acids; nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) are polymers of nucleotides; polysaccharides are polymers of carbohydrates

bi·o·pol·y·mer

(bīō-poli-mĕr)
A naturally occurring compound that is a polymer containing identical or similar subunits.
References in periodicals archive ?
The principal reason behind writing this report is to present a current assessment of the sustainable biopolymers market from both a technological and market point of view, as well as to outline future trends and key developments.
A relative few will prosper and grow, and many of these will be acquired by established biopolymers firms or ultimately by multinational chemical and plastics firms.
Production of PHB and P(3HB-co-3HV) biopolymers of Bacillus megaterium strain OU303A isolated from municipal sewage sludge.
This addresses a large unmet need within the biopolymer industry, with applications for adhesives and sealants, plastic additives, inks and toners, paints and coatings, and medical devices.
Using applicable ASTM test methods, the marine biodegradability of Mirel PHA biopolymers has been shown to be similar to that of cellulose and paper, and is faster than other commercially available biodegradable polymers, said the company.
The elongation at break of the composite films was considerably affected by the addition of graphene for both biopolymers (Fig.
Dig into these figures, though, and you discover that certain biopolymers are loved much more than others.
In a beaker of 1.0 L, were added 300.0 mL of distilled water, 3.0 g of petroleum, and adsorbent (flakes and powder biopolymers) varying between 4 and 10 g.
Since landfill sites are becoming scarce, one solution is to substitute recalcitrant petrochemical-based plastics with biopolymers that do not cause such problems [3].
"The purpose of the research is to review the information on the role of different biopolymers in the development of antimicrobial textiles," the research abstract reads.
(2008) used dialysis membrane to retain metal-bound biopolymers from the aqueous sample for the measurement of biopolymer-bound metal [9, 14].
The materials used in the manufacturing process of plastics have gradually shifted from oil- to plant-based material, and during the transition various biopolymers have been developed.