biopolymer

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bi·o·pol·y·mer

(bī'ō-pol'ē-mer),
A naturally occurring compound that is a polymer containing identical or similar subunits.

biopolymer

(bī′ō-pŏl′ə-mər)
n.
A macromolecule in a living organism that is formed by linking together several smaller molecules, as a protein from amino acids or DNA from nucleotides.

biopolymer

Any biomacromolecule found within a living thing, which consists of monomeric units covalently bonded to form larger units—e.g., proteins and peptides are (bio)polymers of amino acids; nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) are polymers of nucleotides; polysaccharides are polymers of carbohydrates

bi·o·pol·y·mer

(bīō-poli-mĕr)
A naturally occurring compound that is a polymer containing identical or similar subunits.

biopolymer

any protein or nucleic acid produced by a living organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using applicable ASTM test methods, the marine biodegradability of Mirel PHA biopolymers has been shown to be similar to that of cellulose and paper, and is faster than other commercially available biodegradable polymers, said the company.
This is the first time we ve seen these sorts of compounds found associated with straight-chained biopolymers.
The production capacity for these older biopolymers will rise from around 600,000 tonnes in 2012 to 1 million tonnes by 2017, but their share of global production capacity will fall from 43% to just 16%.
Further research is yet to be carried out to translate the potential of biopolymers into industrial reality.
It is an exciting time in the biopolymers industry, as both consumers and business owners continue to recognize the importance of sustainable materials.
These improved features are expected to enable the use of Ingeo biopolymers across a broader range of fiber and nonwoven applications, providing larger processing windows.
University of Pittsburgh researchers suggest that biopolymers are not necessarily better for the environment than their petroleum-based relatives and that traditional plastics can be less environmentally taxing to produce.
The food industry has discovered edible biopolymer films, and producers and consumers alike are enjoying the benefits.
Chemical and physical methods for protecting biopolymers against pests.
Biopolymers may be the "silicon" of tomorrow's polymers, with a potential impact on a wide spectrum of both electronic and opto electronic devices, while at the same time being inexpensive and easy to process.
Ragauskas, with almost 20 years of experience in oxidative bleaching chemistry, carbohydrate, fiber/lignin/cellulose chemistry and nanobiotechnology, is currently pursuing research in the areas of biopolymers and pulp and paper science.
Biopolymers are polymers generated from renewable natural sources.