pesticide

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pesticide

 [pes´tĭ-sīd]
a poison used to destroy pests of any sort.

pes·ti·cide

(pes'ti-sīd),
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.

pesticide

(pĕs′tĭ-sīd′)
n.
A substance or agent used to kill pests, such as unwanted or harmful insects, rodents, or weeds.

pes′ti·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.

pesticide

Toxicology An annihilator of ambient arachnids, antagonistic arthropods, abominable animacules or pugnacious plants–eg, fumigants, fungicides, herbicides, insecticides; most are toxic and potentially fatal, with high arsenical or organophosphate content, and store in adipose tissue, given their lipid solubility Types Organochlorines-eg, DDT, chlordane, mirex, organophosphates–eg, parathion, diazinon, carbamates–eg, Aldicarb, carbaryl, carbofuran, metals–eg, copper, tributyl-tin oxide, pyrethroids–eg, permethrin, cypermethrin, etc–eg, 2,4-D, atrazine, paraquat. See Intermediate syndrome, Organophosphate pesticide.

pes·ti·cide

(pes'ti-sīd)
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.

pesticide

any agent that causes the death of a pest. The general definition is usually restricted to chemicals with pesticidal properties, such as herbicides, insecticides, acaricides and fungicides. Pesticide application can produce many problems, for example:
  1. (a) destruction of organisms useful to man (‘nontarget’ species).
  2. (b) directly harmful effects to man if used incorrectly
  3. (c) accumulation and concentration in food chains leading to toxicity in animals at a higher TROPHIC LEVEL.

pesticide

a poison used to destroy pests of any sort. See arsenical, carbamates, chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphorus compound, pyrethroids.

pesticide poisoning
pesticides are selective poisons chosen for use because of their relative safety for humans and animals. It is likely that they will poison these species if they are used in sufficient quantity or in special circumstances, for example when the water intake of the subject animals is limited.
pesticide resistance
continued use of a single agent, or a group of closely allied agents, can cause selective survival of insects with innate tolerance of the agent and lead to the development of a resistant population.
pesticide tissue residues
some pesticides have had to be withdrawn from use because of their persistence in the tissues of animals including humans. The passage of the agent in the milk of the animal is a comparable problem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of the way the biopesticide kills lepidopteran insects, the 6,000 acres were treated twice, a few days apart, by aerial application from two twin-engine.
When used in Integrated Pest Management systems, the efficacy of biopesticides can be equal to or better than conventional products, especially for crops such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, and flowers.
Be the leading source of information to key influencers who impact acceptance, commercialization, and adoption of biopesticides.
Table 1: Main examples of commercial baculovirus biopesticides
025 ug/ml) in leaf dip method [22]which shown highly toxic biopesticide among the biopesticides that tested and which is in agreed with our results.
Conidia have long been the spores of choice for biopesticide uses, but other fungal cells can be just as effective, including yeastlike structures called "blastospores" and clumps of pigmented fibers known as "microsclerotia.
The results suggest that combining fungal biopesticides and ITNs may be an efficient and effective strategy for malaria vector control.
Semiautomated quantification of cytotoxic damage induced in cultured insect cells exposed to commercial Bacillus thuringiensis biopesticides.
Milner says the vital first step in developing a biopesticide is finding an isolate of the fungus which is highly infectious for the particular pest.
Biopesticides are microbial or biochemical products used in agriculture, public health, and forestry, typically derived from natural or biological origins.
The findings summarized here focus on biopesticides and other alternatives to chemical pesticides as a particular set of tools for crop protection.
Handbook of biofertilizers and microbial biopesticides.