bionics

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bionics

 [bi-on´iks]
scientific study of how functions, characteristics, and phenomena observed in the living world can be applied to nonliving systems.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·on·ics

(bī-on'iks),
1. The science of biologic functions and mechanisms as applied to electronic chemistry; such as computers, employing various aspects of physics, mathematics, and chemistry; for example, improving cybernetic engineering by reference to the organization of the vertebrate nervous system.
2. The science of applying the knowledge gained by studying the characteristics of living organisms to the formulation of nonorganic devices and techniques.
[bio- + electronics]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bionics

(bī-ŏn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
Application of biological principles to the study and design of engineering systems, especially electronic systems.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bionics

An evolving field that studies biological structure and function in order to create electronic and mechanical devices and synthetic body parts that would serve as viable substitutes for limbs, organs and tissues degenerated, destroyed or damaged by accidents or injuries of war.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·on·ics

(bī-on'iks)
1. The science of biologic functions and mechanisms as applied to electronic technology.
2. The science of applying the knowledge gained by studying the characteristics of living organisms to the formulation of nonorganic devices and techniques.
[bio- + electronics]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bionics

Biological principles applied to the design of engineering systems, especially electronic systems.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Hero Arm - the world's first medically-approved 3D print bionic arm - works by picking up muscle signals.
The most important aspect of the bionic arm is its connectivity to the nerves on the end of the arm.
This research work will focus on making possible these movements of a bionic arm. The aim of this research is to design a bionic elbow joint to facilitate amputees for routine work.
One North East soldier, who was fitted with a bionic arm after his right arm was blown off by a rocket-propelled grenade during a gunfight with Taliban extremists, today welcomed the research project.
The injury is severe enough that David may need a robot (or at least a bionic arm) to help him do the job in the future, and I'm sad to say that robotic editors already exist, but let's never speak of such technology again.
But it's still an all-or-nothing affair: despite the number of sensors and degrees of freedom the contemporary bionic arm may have, the host knows only that a grip is either on or off.
By clicking on the link to "Play Games," students are able to engage in "Questioneering," "Solar Car Racing," "Bionic Arm Design," and more.
The money was to help pay for a bionic arm for Julian Barnes (front, right).
Summary: A 14-year-old boy has received a new, state-of-the-art bionic arm.
STROKE patients in Leamington are being fitted with a bionic arm to help their recover the use of their limbs.
A SOLDIER who lost a limb in a grenade attack has been fitted with a bionic arm by surgeons in Birmingham.
* In the article, Patrick Kane has opted not to have his bionic arm covered with synthetic skin because he thinks it "looks cool" without it.