biome

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biome

 [bi´ōm]
a large, distinct, easily differentiated community of organisms arising as a result of complex interactions of climatic factors, flora, fauna, and substrate; usually designated according to kind of vegetation present, such as tundra, coniferous forest, deciduous forest, or grassland.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·ome

(bī'ōm),
The total complex of biotic communities occupying and characterizing a particular geographic area or zone.
[bio- + -ome]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biome

(bī′ōm′)
n.
A major regional or global biotic community, such as a grassland or desert, characterized chiefly by the dominant forms of plant life and the prevailing climate.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biome

An ecosystem with a distinct climate, organisms and substrates, all of which interact to produce a distinct and complex biotic community.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·ome

(bī'ōm)
The total complex of biotic communities occupying and characterizing a particular geographic area or zone.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

biome

a major regional ecological community of organisms usually defined by the botanical habitat in which they occur and determined by the interaction of the substrate, climate, fauna and flora. The term is often limited to denote terrestrial habitats, e.g. tundra, coniferous forest, grassland. Oceans may be considered as a single biome (the marine biome), though sometimes this is subdivided, e.g. coral reef biome. There is no sharp distinction between adjacent biomes.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent research has demonstrated that changes in the micro biome can leave the host susceptible to infection, and influence disease states.
However, the areas of the previous records are characterized by a forest-type vegetation (the same observed in Para (Amazon biome)), a transition zone (ecotone) between Cerrado and Atlantic Rainforest (Santos and Noll, 2010), and a Riparian Forest and Submontane Deciduous Forest (Silvestre et al., 2010) (Figure 2).
On our way to the Rainforest biome, we learned that ferns are older than dinosaurs, more than 353,000 babies are born every day and that the magnolia was one of the world's first flowering plants.
According to the Brazilian Ministry of Environment (MMA), the Cerrado and the Atlantic Forest are considered biomes of great interest as they are rich in biodiversity and contain several endemic species.
Learn about five strange hotels in different biomes.
Infants without pets in the home were most likely to have a codominated biome, with a relative risk of multiple sensitization of 2.94 when compared with infants with a Bifidobacteriaeae biome and 2.06 compared with those with a Enterobacteriaceae-dominated biome.
A stroll around the steamy Rainforest Biome with its waterfalls, papaya trees and tropical birds makes for an exciting afternoon whatever the weather is doing outside.
However, researchers also found that if the "obese biome'' mice ate a high-fat, low-veggie American-style diet while living with the "stay thin'' mice, the fat mice stayed fat.
Cane sugar can be found growing in the crops area of Eden's Rainforest Biome.
Outside the biomes there is plenty more to explore.
Fantastic experience The rainforest biome is a jungle that will spark the imagination of any youngster.
COLD CONIFER/MIXED WOODLAND: This biome contains both the boreal conifer forest/woodland and the boreal deciduous forest/woodland biomes that are dominated by cool temperate conifers Abies spectablis, Pinus wallichiana, and Juniperus recurva, and evergreen broad-leaved trees Betula utilis, Salix, Vibernum, and Rhododendron anthopogen as sporadic single trees, in groups, or in irregular dense stands.