biomaterial

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biomaterial

 [bi″o-mah-tēr´e-al]
any substance (other than a drug), synthetic or natural, that can be used as a system or part of a system that treats, augments, or replaces any tissue, organ, or function of the body; especially, material suitable for use in prostheses that will be in contact with living tissue.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·ma·ter·i·al

(bī'ō-ma-tē'rē-al),
A synthetic or semisynthetic material used in a biologic system to construct an implantable prosthesis and chosen for its biocompatibility.
[bio- + material]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biomaterial

(bī′ō-mə-tîr′ē-əl)
n.
A biocompatible material that is used to construct artificial organs, rehabilitation devices, or prostheses and replace natural body tissues.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biomaterial

(1) Any synthetic material or device—e.g., implant or prosthesis—designed to treat, enhance or replace an ageing, malfunctioning or cosmetically unacceptable native tissue, organ or function in the body.
(2) A native material used for its structural, not biological, properties—e.g., collagen in cosmetics, carbohydrates modified for biomedical applications or as bulking agents in food manufacture.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

biomaterial

1. Any synthetic material or device–eg implant or prosthesis-intended to treat, enhance or replace an aging or malfunctioning–or cosmetically unacceptable—native tissue, organ or function in the body. See Bioengineering, Breast implants, Hybrid artificial pancreas, Shiley valve, Teflon, Total hip replacement.
2. A biomaterial used for its structural, not biological, properties–eg, collagen in cosmetics, carbohydrates modified by biotechnology to be used as lubricants for biomedical applications or as bulking agents in food manufacture.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bi·o·ma·te·ri·al

(bī'ō-mă-tēr'ē-ăl)
A synthetic or semisynthetic material chosen for its biocompatibility and used in a biologic system to construct an implantable prosthesis.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bi·o·ma·te·ri·al

(bī'ō-mă-tēr'ē-ăl)
A synthetic or semisynthetic material used in a biologic system to construct an implantable prosthesis and chosen for its biocompatibility.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Nerve Repair Biomaterials market research report has been organized with most advanced insight and analysis to give maximum benefits to the Nerve Repair Biomaterials industry.
By adding FIBERGRAFT Technology to its offerings, the company is further enhancing its biomaterials portfolio that currently includes cellular allograft, demineralized bone matrix, and first-generation synthetic solutions.
AdvanSource Biomaterials Corporation's biomaterials are used in devices that are designed for treating a broad range of anatomical sites and disease states, ranging from disposable to permanently implanted products.
Needless to emphasize, the ambitious ventures of Biomedical Technology to repair or support human body is now a reality, and 100s of thousands products are in the global market based on biomaterials. Medical devices including high-risk, long-term implants and diagnostic devices are in high demand world over and the current market size is USD 71 billion.
For example, biomaterials for osteogenic biomaterials have been synthesized using hydroxyapatite [1], an inorganic mineral unique to bone tissue.
The resulting biomaterial speed the process and boosts the chances to create neurons from neural stem cells.
Biomaterials play a key role in creating the environment for cells (Tabata) and must have structural and functional properties (Badylak, 2002) to provide a framework and initial support for the cells in order for them to attach, proliferate, differentiate, and form an Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM).
Metallic biomaterials segment contributed the highest revenue share to the global market, owing to highly used in orthopedic treatments for bone support and replacement, due to their strength and resistance to fatigue degradation.
Stora Enso Oyj (HEL:STERV) (STO:STEA) announced on Wednesday that Markus Mannstrom has been appointed as executive vice president of the company's Biomaterials division, effective 1 June 2017.
The development of new biocompatible materials and/or existing material composition and progressing techniques is expected to broaden the diversity of applications of biomaterials in dentistry field in upcoming years [1].
In wound dressing applications, there is a pressing need to develop biocompatible hydrogel biomaterials [16].