staining

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Related to Biological stain: Biological Stain Commission

staining

 [stān´ing]
artificial coloration of a substance to facilitate examination of tissues, microorganisms, or other cells under the microscope. For various techniques, see under stain.
relief staining a method of staining that colors the background and leaves the cells uncolored.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

stain·ing

(stān'ing),
1. The act of applying a stain.
See also: stain.
2. In dentistry, modification of the color of the tooth or denture base.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

stain·ing

(stān'ing)
1. The act of applying a stain.
See also: stain
2. dentistry Modification of the color of the tooth or denture base.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

staining

The use of selected dyes to colour biological specimens such as cells, cell products, thin slices of tissues or microorganisms to assist in examination and identification under the microscope. See also GRAM NEGATIVE, GRAM POSITIVE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

stain·ing

(stān'ing)
1. In dentistry, modification of the color of the tooth or denture base.
2. Act of applying a stain.
See also: stain
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Report of the Immunohistochemistry Steering Committee of the Biological Stain Commission: proposed format: package inserts for immunohistochemistry products.
Using an RNA- based assay to identify biological stains offers several advantages over conventional methods, including greater specificity, simultaneous analysis through common assay format, the potential for automation, and decreased sample consumption.
Studies have shown that mRNA is stable in biological stains of forensic relevance and can be recovered in sufficient quantity and quality for analysis (Juusola and Ballantyne 2003).
DYLON'S set of three Stain Removers tackle oily, greasy stains like lipstick, and biological stains like food, drink and collar grime.
For laundry detergents and presoaks, the scientist envisions the protease taking its place along with several other enzymes including lipases, amylases, and cellulases to enhance removal of different kinds of biological stains.
Although the primary focus of this test was the ability of the formulations to prevent biological stains, the presence of chemical stains was noted at the 90- and 180-day evaluations (Table 11).