primary structure

(redirected from Biological sequence)
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pri·mar·y struc·ture

in a macromolecule, the sequence of subunits that make up that macromolecule; for example, the amino acid sequence of a protein.

primary structure

n.
The linear sequence of amino acids in a protein or of nucleotides in a nucleic acid.

primary structure

  1. the linear sequence of amino acids in a POLYPEPTIDE CHAIN.
  2. the NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE in nucleic acids.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally, all types of biological sequence comparison exploit the sequence alignment based on a dynamic programming approach.
(2011) Parallel Processing of Multiple Pattern Matching Algorithms for Biological Sequences: Methods and Performance Results.
Bader, "A tile-based parallel Viterbi algorithm for biological sequence alignment on GPU with CUDA," Parallel & Distributed Processing, Workshops and Phd Forum (IPDPSW), 2010 IEEE International Symposium on, vol., no., pp.1,8, 19-23 April 2010.
The course of action for a fast exact pattern matching algorithm for biological sequences is the same as FS algorithm [19].
(2010) "A Hardware Accelerator for the Fast Retrieval of DIALIGN Biological Sequence Alignments in Linear Space", IEEE Transactions on Computers, 59(6): 808-821.
While custom in-house code will be written for these large data searches, TGen reports that benchmarks were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool), an algorithm for comparing primary biological sequence information, ClustalW, a general purpose multiple sequence alignment program for DNA or proteins, and NAMD, a parallel molecular dynamics code for large biomolecular systems.
Compiled from 15 assembled resources including GenBank, RefSeq, Entrez Gene and UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, BONDplus allows researchers to move beyond the genome and leverage publicly available biological sequence data, BINDplus biomolecular interaction data as well as GENESEQ, a value added database of patented biological sequences.
The nodes of an abstract syntax tree are used to generate a suffix tree and we use the same methods on the suffix tree that have been successfully applied to biological sequence matching to search for duplicate sections of code.
Training is designed for educators, principal investigators, postdoctoral fellows, graduate and advanced undergraduate students, and others in the life sciences who work with biological sequence data.
"You could design a series of [particles] that can latch onto a biological sequence," Mirkin says.

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