chronobiology

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chronobiology

 [kron″o-bi-ol´ah-je]
the scientific study of the effect of time on living systems and of biological rhythms. adj., adj chronobiolog´ic, chronobiolog´ical.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

chron·o·bi·ol·o·gy

(kron'ō-bī-ol'ō-jē),
That aspect of biology concerned with the timing of biologic events, especially repetitive or cyclic phenomena in individual organisms.
[chrono- + G. bios, life, + logos, study]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

chronobiology

(krŏn′ō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of the effects of time and rhythmical phenomena on life processes.

chron′o·bi·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), chron′o·bi·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
chron′o·bi·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
chron′o·bi·ol′o·gist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Pharmacology The formal study of the effects of circadian rhythms on the timing of illness and therapy
Physiology The formal study of circadian rhythms on physiologic and pathologic events
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

chronobiology

Pharmacology The formal study of the effects of circadian rhythms on the timing of illness, and therapy Physiology The formal study of circadian rhythms on physiologic and pathologic events. See Biorhythm, Chronotherapy, Circadian rhythm.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

chron·o·bi·ol·o·gy

(kron'ō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē)
That aspect of biology concerned with the timing of biologic events, especially repetitive or cyclic phenomena.
[chrono- + G. bios, life, + logos, study]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Emerging science reveals that each of us has an optimal time to fall asleep and wake up, a personalised biological rhythm known as a "chronotype." When you don't sleep at the time your body wants to sleep -- your biological night -- you don't sleep as well or as long, setting the stage not only for fatigue, poor work performance and errors but also health problems ranging from heart disease and obesity to anxiety and depression.
The association between biological rhythms, depression, and functioning in bipolar disorder: a large multi-center study.
Finding these patterns reflected in students' login data spurred researchers to investigate whether digital records might also reflect the biological rhythms underlying people's behavior.
Chronopharmacology is the science dealing with the optimization of drug effects and minimization of adverse effects by timing the medications in relation to the biological rhythm. [1]
What on Earth is Chronotype?" Journal of Biological Rhythms, vol.
Daan, "Revealing oft-cited but unpublished papers of Colin Pittendrigh and coworkers," Journal of Biological Rhythms, vol.
This relationship is bidirectional, and mood can affect biological rhythms. As disruptions in the circadian timing system can be related to mood disorders, failure of the biological clock to function properly, damage to the clock mechanism, or the presence of a genetic defect may be involved in the etiology of mood disorders.
"We have biological rhythms that maintain our health: ultradian, circadian, diurnal, infradian.
Introducing biological rhythms: A primer on the temporal organization of life, with implications for health, society, reproduction, and the natural environment.
The biological rhythms of each individual are vulnerable, and their misalignment entangles mood and sleep variations; the last two are closely connected.
Both theses focused on the correlation between light and health--Bae's "Urban Therapy" explored a side effect of the increasing amount of time spent indoors and natural biological rhythms, and Ryan's "The Impact of Weekly Lighting Condition on Performance, Sleepiness, and Mood" focused on the biological clock over the course of a week.

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