reductionism

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reductionism

an erroneous belief that complex situations may be explained by reducing them to their component parts and explaining these.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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* Biological reductionism may undermine a complete ethical understanding of psychosis.
According to Kaut, biological reductionism clearly has had a positive impact on our understanding of medical and human services.
Marshall, like Barad, suggests that leaving the "fleshy material of the body" to scientists while social analysts focus on discourse has permitted "new forms of biological determinism to flourish." Her point is not to once again say, "it's all in your head," but she asks: what current social conditions are fueling the new biological reductionism which simplifies and commodities women's sexuality?--question also raised by Martin in this issue.
To provide focus, I will concentrate on three of Mick's main criticisms: that I fail to pay attention to the social forms ideas take in producing environmental problems and in resolving them; that I am adopting a form of biological reductionism (a cybernetic model); and that this turns out to support a kind of Panglossian ethic.
Labeling themselves, in both this and their previous volume, as nonreductive physicalists, Murphy and Brown present a view that human mental functioning, while embedded in the brain, cannot be explained either by biological reductionism (bottom-up causation) or Cartesian dualism (physical body, nonphysical mind).
Even though accounts of reasons for admission to hospital during the mid-Victorian era included many moral (now psychological), not just physical, explanations (Hunter and Macalpine, 1963) biological reductionism soon became an important plank of medical authority.
More ambitiously, he defends the German philosopher's dialectical philosophy as a means of articulating a concept of life that eludes both biological reductionism and the hypo-stasization of life as a process that requires the dissolution of the human subject.
For this reason, I welcomed with great relief the explanation of Joseph Ratzinger of 'biological reductionism'--the new form of deconstruction, the biological myth.
It fails when a few underemphasize social work's biopsychosocial lens and overstate its allegiance to a biological reductionism, now itself on the way out.

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