biohazard

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biohazard

(bī′ō-hăz′ərd)
n.
1. A biological agent, such as an infectious microorganism, or a condition that constitutes a threat to humans, especially in biological research or experimentation.
2. The potential danger, risk, or harm from exposure to such an agent or condition.

bi′o·haz′ard·ous (-ər-dəs) adj.

biohazard

[-haz′ərd]
Etymology: Gk, bios, life; OFr, hasard
anything that is a risk to organisms, such as ionizing radiation or harmful bacteria or viruses.
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Biohazard label

biohazard

A general term for pathogenic bacteria, viruses or other dangerous biologic agents, which may arise in clinical specimens or have been created by genetic recombination.

bi·o·haz·ard

(bī'ō-haz'ărd)
Contaminated or infective waste such as blood and body fluids.

bi·o·haz·ard

(bī'ō-haz'ărd)
Any material, substance, or item usually contaminated with transmissible pathogenic microorganisms (e.g., bacteria, viruses) that poses a risk to health.
References in periodicals archive ?
Urban garbage collectors in the municipality of Dourados (MS) and their perception towards biological hazards in their work process.
Related to biological hazards alone, researchers found the large amount of related literature often overwhelms and confuses individuals (Moore, Merryman, Hartman, & Klingborg, 2008).
For the adult male farmers, significant and positive association between biological hazards and irrigation is confirmed with the value of 3.
Workers can encounter biological hazards like animals, bacteria and insects; physical threats like slipping and falling; or psychological hazards like the effects of working in isolation for long periods of time.
They also look at environmental hazards such as animal attacks and exposure to chemical and biological hazards.
The conference will also address seafood standards and regulations, the fisheries policies and strategies, the application of international standards in the Omani market, consumer behavior towards seafood safety and quality, the risks and benefits of seafood, as well as the physical, chemical and biological hazards in seafood, human inputs and their impact on the marine environment, post-harvest quality and tracking systems, the impact of traceability on seafood quality and marketing, value added seafood, taking advantage of unconventional marine resources, the development of new Omani products using unexploited non-fish materials and marketing them.
Biological hazards are those hazards of biological origin which adversely impact both human health and the environment.
For the most relevant foodborne biological hazards, the EFSA has also proposed harmonised epidemiological indicators to be used in the context of the proposed comprehensive meat safety assurance system.
Food processing facilities then must establish and implement a food safety system that includes risk-based analysis and preventive controls for potential chemical, physical and biological hazards.
The strategy focuses on containing the threat of biological hazards, and ruling them out before, during and after any occurrence.
Some common species of biological hazards includes Salmonella, Listeria and S.
On a daily basis, nurses come into contact with a host of physical, chemical, and biological hazards in the healthcare environment.

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