biohazard

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biohazard

(bī′ō-hăz′ərd)
n.
1. A biological agent, such as an infectious microorganism, or a condition that constitutes a threat to humans, especially in biological research or experimentation.
2. The potential danger, risk, or harm from exposure to such an agent or condition.

bi′o·haz′ard·ous (-ər-dəs) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biohazard

A general term for pathogenic bacteria, viruses or other dangerous biologic agents, which may arise in clinical specimens or have been created by genetic recombination.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·haz·ard

(bī'ō-haz'ărd)
Contaminated or infective waste such as blood and body fluids.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bi·o·haz·ard

(bī'ō-haz'ărd)
Any material, substance, or item usually contaminated with transmissible pathogenic microorganisms (e.g., bacteria, viruses) that poses a risk to health.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Once equipped with the PPE, they entered a room with controlled temperature and humidity and had to attend to a convulsing patient with possible biological hazard. After 10 minutes of simulation, the patient suffered a cardiac arrest and the volunteers had to perform a regulated resuscitation during 20 minutes.
The project accomplished all its stated goals: it strengthened occupational health and safety committees in the selected hospitals; it assessed occupational hazards present in the hospitals, focusing on biological hazards; it built human capacity for preventing, controlling, and eliminating occupational risks; and it fostered international collaboration for promoting and protecting the health of health care workers.
For the adult male farmers, significant and positive association between biological hazards and irrigation is confirmed with the value of 3.417 (P=0.065).
Yet, in the context of biological hazards, although not mentioned in the studies found, prions also constitute infectious agents of relevance in waste management.
Among the biological hazards, contamination might be due to viruses, such as the papillomavirus (HPV), especially HPV type 7, which causes the so-called "butcher's wart" (3).
Where bodily fluids are tested, there can be biological hazards and often a requirement for particular storage and disposal methods.
Products include body armor, ballistic blankets, tactical clothing and protective products against chemical and biological hazards.
Biological hazards include influenza, insect bites, tuberculosis, malaria, dengue, diarrhea, cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A, parasitic diseases, fungal infections.13
[6] Majority of the participants were well aware about the biological hazards (HIV and HBV) associated with dentistry, which might be a reason for many participants in our study undergoing vaccination.
chemical and biological hazards) is a daunting task in and of itself, without adding in the handicap of being tied to an uncooperative database.
Biological hazards are common in aseptic manufacturing and research and include risks associated with handling potentially pathogenic materials.
"It is important to be aware of the biological hazards a rodent infestation can pose and be in a position to identify the risk and deal with it effectively.

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