biofouling

(redirected from Biological fouling)
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Related to Biological fouling: Microfouling

biofouling

(bī′ō-fou′lĭng)
n.
The impairment or degradation of something, such as a ship's hull or mechanical equipment, as a result of the growth or activity of living organisms.

bi′o·foul′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effects from biological fouling and corrosion were reduced by treating the cooling tower water with a sufficient amount of chlorine and Tolytriazole, which is a chemical additive that prevented corrosion (Hollander and May 1985, Walker 1976).
Copper bearing tube materials can lessen certain kinds of biological fouling.
Because biological fouling and corrosion are usually prevented by using an inhibitor, the deposit rate in a condenser cooled by water circulating through a cooling tower is dominated by precipitation and particulate fouling mechanisms.
In the first stage of biological fouling, organic molecules, such as polysaccharides and proteins, rapidly accumulate over the surface to form a "conditioning film," Bacteria and single-cell diatoms settle on this modified surface to form a microbial biofilm.
Chemical treatment, such as chlorine, may be used to control these growths to avoid a reduction in heat transfer capabilities and to minimize biological fouling on metal surfaces.
The problem of sensor drift due to biological fouling may be severe in some regions, and methods to prevent fouling are just being developed.
The requirements for marine coating systems carry a tall order, including the protection of vessels and structures in harsh and diverse environmental conditions (saltwater immersion, extreme temperatures, ultraviolet radiation exposure, humidity, physical impact from wave action, biological fouling [barnacles], etc.
1981), including: particulate fouling, crystalline or precipitation fouling, chemical reaction fouling, corrosion fouling, and biological fouling or biofouling.
In addition, showing the growth of some types of biological materials on HVAC heat exchangers in typical buildings is important to help building operators implement solutions to biological fouling of such units.
Biological fouling from algae deposits can clog up plumbing.