DNA computing

(redirected from Biological computer)
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DNA computing

n.
Molecular computing using DNA molecules.
The manipulation of data represented by strings of DNA base pairs instead of binary digits, with calculations carried out by common manipulations—e.g., combining, copying, and extracting strands
References in periodicals archive ?
When asked what a biological computer looks like, Keinan laughs.
As Benenson says, "The ability to combine biological components at will in a modular, plug-and-play fashion means that we now approach the stage when the concept of programming as we know it from software engineering can be applied to biological computers. Bio-engineers will literally be able to program in future."
It is a world of organ transplants, biological computers and artificial intelligences.
This proposal sets out a research project that will construct biological computers formed from engineered bacterial populations that communicate using quorum sensing molecules.
"Biological computers can be used to study and reprogram living systems, monitor environments and improve cellular therapeutics," said Drew Endy, assistant professor of bioengineering and the paper's senior author.
These primitive networks could be the key to building a new generation of biological computers, say researchers.
Although still a long way off, the team suggest that these biological logic gates could one day form the building blocks in microscopic biological computers.
Although still a long way off, the team suggest that these biological logic gates could one day form the building blocks in microscopic biological computers. Devices may include sensors that swim inside arteries, detecting the build up of harmful plaque and rapidly delivering medications to the affected zone.
Marshall says he has always looked for a way to combine his childhood loves of engineering and biology, citing a 1981 article in OMNI magazine which described fantastical biological computers: The idea was that you could build computers and other machines using biological building blocks.
Professor Andrew Adamatzky, Director of the Centre for Unconventional Computing at UWE Bristol, who will lead on the digital coordinated mechanisms, added: We will produce buildings which are biological computers.
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