bioassay

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bioassay

 [bi″o-as´a]
determination of the active power of a drug sample by comparing its effects on a live animal or an isolated organ preparation with those of a reference standard.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·as·say

(bī'ō-as'ā),
Determination of the potency or concentration of a compound by its effect on animals, isolated tissues, or microorganisms, as compared with an analysis of its chemical or physical properties.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bioassay

(bī′ō-ăs′ā′, -ă-sā′)
n.
1. Determination of the strength or biological activity of a substance, such as a drug, by comparing its effects with those of a standard preparation on a test organism.
2. A test used to determine such strength or activity.
tr.v. bioas·sayed, bioas·saying, bioas·says
To cause to undergo a bioassay.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bioassay

Lab medicine
Any quantification procedure to detect:
(1) The activity or potency—functional or effective—amount of a substance—e.g., antibiotic, chemical, drug, hormone, metabolit, vitamin, etc.—in a biological fluid;
(2) Toxicity of a substance (e.g., a pollutant) or organism (e.g., a pathogen) of interest in an in vivo system, i.e., in a cell or animal; in bioassays, the effect is tested on living cells or organisms.
 
Molecular biology
An assay that uses a living system, such as an intact cell, to measure an effect or a molecule of interest.
 
Radiation physics
A determination of the quantity of radioactive material in the human body, either by direct measurement—in vivo counting—or by analysis of excreta.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·as·say

(bī'ō-as'ā)
Determination of the potency or concentration of a compound by its effect on animals, isolated tissues, or microorganisms, as contrasted with analysis of its chemical or physical properties.
Synonym(s): biologic assay, biotest.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bioassay

A method of measuring the potency of a drug or other biochemical agent by comparing its effects on animals with those of known preparations of standard strength.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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Most biological assays are performed on immobilized fluorophores.
Many medical associations issue reports or position statements on controversial procedures, drugs, biological assays and medical devices.
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The Canadian team of organic chemists and enzymologists developed drug design motifs, and pursued preparative chemistry, enzymology, molecular biology, and tissue culture studies that were interfaced with biological assays and pharmacokinetic studies carried out in Syntex, Palo Alto, CA.
In the past, biological assays of acid rain's effects on lakes have focused largely on sport fish.
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PositiveID develops biological detection and diagnostics systems, specializing in the development of microfluidic systems for the automated preparation of and performance of biological assays.
According to the collaboration, patient DNA samples will be collected and analysed to identify and further validate genetic targets, biological assays to probe gene function, and subsequent drug discovery and development activities.
The assay answers the question of bioavailability at the cellular level, and was specifically developed to assist the transition of analytical chemistry testing of natural products into biological assays in vitro and in vivo.
Such interaction could not be discovered by the assays available at the start of the studies but development of new biological assays has revealed a stability issue related to certain containers.
Life science applications are supported with a wide array of preprogrammed biological assays to analyse protein and nucleic acid samples and perform cell growth measurements.

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