biological agent

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biological agent

A euphemism for a pathogenic microorganism or virus, or other toxic biological material, which has the potential of being used as a weapon of mass destruction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

biological agent

Military medicine A euphemism for a pathogenic microorganism or virus, or other toxic biological material, intended for use as a weapon of mass destruction.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
3: Biocrime (BC): It is the threat or use of biological agents for individual objectives such as revenge or financial gain.
His updated resource text covers the fundamental practices and advanced tactics of emergency response to chemical and biological agents, and is designed for local hazardous materials response teams and first responders, and the federal government agencies who assist them.
DHS has two ongoing efforts to improve the detection technology used by the BioWatch program, which deploys detectors to collect data that are then analyzed to detect the presence of specific biological agents. First, the Directorate for Science and Technology (S&T) within DHS is developing next-generation detectors for the BioWatch program.
The newfound stability promises scientists a means to study important biological agents in their natural environment, report the gadget's inventors.
The NIH and other agencies in the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) are currently supporting extramural research to develop new products to protect the public from the health consequences of biological agents that might be used in acts of terrorism or war.
Using sensors to protect public buildings faces two major challenges: There are too many potential chemical and biological agents to detect reliably, and even with the fastest sensors, some people will become victims before the sensor can respond and an alert can be sounded.
Even four years after the anthrax attacks, the public doesn't have a good sense of the types, symptoms, treatment, and lethality of biological agents. The National Academies and the U.S.
This article provides pertinent information including (a) a description of bioterrorism and biological agents, (b) the psychological impact of bioterrorism, (c) school counselors' role in a school-related incident, and (d) disaster mental health principles and procedures.
According to the Committee on Materials and Manufacturing Processes for Advanced Sensors at the National Research Council, within 5 years, high value facilities may be able to deploy biological detection systems that can identify an extensive range of biological agents in 1 minute or less, with very few false alarms.
The appendices on chemical and biological agents offer concise, formatted summaries similar to those available through other resources, but ironically provide relatively little information about the agents' potential as weapons.
His September 2002 dossier stated that: "Iraq has continued to produce chemical and biological agents."
Accurate files that track the vaccines and treatments soldiers receive and where or when they may have been exposed to biological agents in the field are critical to veterans: The information is vital in helping to diagnose, treat, and identify the cause of illnesses they may develop years later, and it also helps qualify them for veteran's benefits.

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