bioinformatics

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bi·o·in·for·ma·tics

(bī'ō-in'fōr-mat'iks),
A scientific discipline encompassing all aspects of biologic information acquisition, processing, storage, distribution, analysis, and interpretation that combines the tools and techniques of mathematics, computer science, and biology with the aim of understanding the biologic significance of a variety of data.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bioinformatics

(bī′ō-ĭn′fər-măt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The use of computer science, mathematics, and information theory to organize and analyze complex biological data, especially genetic data. Also called biocomputing.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
The computerised management, manipulation and analysis of large blocks of biomolecular data—especially DNA sequence data—using advanced computing, including electronic databases on genomes, protein sequences and 3-dimensional modeling of biomolecules and biologic systems
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bioinformatics

Informatics The use of information technology to acquire, store, manage and analyze biological data. See Genomics, Informatics. Cf Chemoinformatics.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bi·o·in·for·mat·ics

(bī'ō-in'fōr-mat'iks)
A scientific discipline encompassing all aspectsof biologic information acquisition, processing, storage, distribution, analysis, and interpretation; it combines the tools and techniques of mathematics, computer science, and biology with the aim of understanding the biologic significance of a variety of data.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bioinformatics

The branch of information science concerned with large databases of biochemical or pharmaceutical information.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

bioinformatics

the computer-based discipline that includes methods for storage, retrieval and analysis of biological data, such as RNA, DNA and PROTEIN sequences, structures and genetic interactions, by constructing electronic databases.

It is particularly relevant to GENOMICS, because of the need to manage the large amount of data generated by this research. Sometimes referred to as MOLECULAR BIOLOGY IN SILICO.

Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Bioinformaticians have developed mathematical and statistical formulas, or algorithms, for sorting through large chunks of raw data to locate genes.
Horton, "A bioinformatician's guide to the forefront of suffix array construction algorithms," Briefings in Bioinformatics, vol.
So, you don't have to be a mathematician to understand how to code, and you don't have to be a biologist to become a bioinformatician. Yes, both of these are useful in understanding the process but really, computing is a field open to anybody with the interest and the opportunity.
2- Be a computer past master: Being a Bioinformatician, you must be a computer expert because 99 per cent of your project will be computer based.
In 2010 officials at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control asked bioinformatician Jennifer Gardy to sequence the genomes of 32 bacterial isolates from a large tuberculosis outbreak in the province.
in 2003, bioinformatician Lincoln Stein famously gave bioinformatics
But the new study also yielded paternal information, says study coauthor Joaquin Dopazo, a bioinformatician at the Prince Felipe Research Center.
A bioinformatician can determine haplotypes by using different bioinformatics algorithm such as Haploview on sequence data [103].
The role of the bioinformatician and bioinformatics work flows are new to clinical sequencing laboratories and require substantial investments in education, personnel, and hardware as well as plasticity in processes and parties involved in the testing.
Penny and Collins [117] proposed the simple thought experiment in which the bioinformatician exchanges rows of sequence sites in the alignment matrix and asks what was lost in the process.
His search in collaboration with a bioinformatician in the Shilatifard lab, Alexander S.

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