gerontology

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Related to Biogerontologist: forensic psychology

aging

 [āj´ing]
the gradual changes in the structure of any organism that occur with the passage of time, that do not result from disease or other gross accidents, and that eventually lead to the increased probability of death as the individual grows older. See also aged and senescence, and see the Atlas on Aging.

ger·on·tol·o·gy

(jer'on-tol'ŏ-jē),
The scientific study of the clinical, sociologic, biologic and psychological phenomena related to aging.
Synonym(s): geratology
[geronto- + G. logos, study]

gerontology

(jĕr′ən-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The scientific study of the biological, psychological, and sociological phenomena associated with old age and aging.

ge·ron′to·log′i·cal (jə-rŏn′tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), ge·ron′to·log′ic (-lŏj′ĭk) adj.
ger′on·tol′o·gist n.

gerontology

Geriatics The systematic study of aging and age-related phenomena; senescence is attributed to
1. Accumulation of degradation products, coupled with a cell's ↑ inability to metabolize the products and/or.
2. Activation of longevity-determining or aging genes, that may be intimately linked to certain oncogenes–eg, c-fos, which evokes uncontrolled cell proliferation. See Garbage can hypothesis.

ger·on·tol·o·gy

(jer'ŏn-tol'ŏ-jē)
The scientific study of the process and problems of aging.
[geronto- + G. logos, study]

gerontology

The study of the biology, psychology and sociology of ageing. Gerontology is concerned with the changes that occur in the cells, tissues and organs of the body with age, with the natural limits of cell reproduction, the causes of natural cell death, the effects of life style and physical activity on longevity and the psychological and sociological effects of ageing.

ger·on·tol·o·gy

(jer'ŏn-tol'ŏ-jē)
Scientific study of clinical, sociologic, biologic, and psychological phenomena related to aging.
[geronto- + G. logos, study]
References in periodicals archive ?
If one assumes, as biogerontologists do, that human aging is a perfectly normal process and not in itself pathological, it looks as if many biogerontologists are already intent on taking health care at least several steps beyond the treatment of disease and into the realm of biomedical human enhancement.
The first lesson that has emerged from the biogerontologists' experience is simple: while fighting disease always garners more public funding than health promotion, new biomedical enhancements will always have a bigger private market than new disease cures.
(34) Biogerontologists argue that prolonged senescence would be the are stilt of permitting only piecemeal interventions and could be avoided by addressing the biggest common risk factor for age-related pathologies: aging at the basic biological level.
(39) Some biogerontologists, on the other hand, anticipate a decelerated decompression, possibly even extending the human life span.
Despite the biogerontologists' insistence that aging is not pathological, the attempt to differentiate between aging and disease is problematic.
This vision suggests another challenge for these biogerontologists that goes beyond explaining how they differ from "anti-aging medicine." That is the challenge of anticipating the social implications of their success.
For "decelerating" biogerontologists, anticipating the implications of success will mean supporting informed speculation on a number of important social policy questions.
Some biogerontologists envision achieving an "engineered negligible senescence" by continuously reversing the damage caused by basic metabolic processes.
The further away from the orthodox biogerontological research community such speculations range, of course, the more nervous biogerontologists are about them.
However, it would be unfortunate if the biogerontologists' current campaign obscured the need to consider the philosophical implications of their research program and the social consequences of its achievement.