nutrient cycle

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nutrient cycle

the passage of a nutrient through an ECOSYSTEM so that it eventually becomes reavailable to the PRIMARY PRODUCERS.
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Plant impact on the biogeochemical cycle of silicon and related weathering processes.
While talking to students, Dr Anjum Nasim Sabri said that study of ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles was very important and one could understand the importance of environment protection only with the knowledge of the factors that operate in an ecosystem.
Soil is the interface for all of the biogeochemical cycles.
There is also background on biogeochemical cycles, environmental chemistry, and green chemistry.
Without ever opening their textbooks, my high school biology students can usually give a plausible-sounding account of biogeochemical cycles.
In a paper published in Global Biogeochemical Cycles, (1) Dr Canadell and his co-authors concluded from modelling studies that frozen high-latitude soils contain vast quantities of carbon, about twice as much carbon as is currently in the atmosphere, and that destabilisation of this frozen 'carbon pool' could influence carbon-climate feedbacks.
He lists his main research interests as stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, and their role in the biogeochemical cycles and climate.
The applications of Kiene's research have advanced our understanding of microbial food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and how microorganisms in the ocean can affect atmospheric chemistry and ultimately global climate.
Most ecologists, I would guess, would exclude rocks from this kind of participation, and I believe it would be a mistake to claim that concepts like biogeochemical cycles show that ecologists have the same concept of the "web of life" as most indigenous peoples might use the phrase.
Thus, they control global utilization of nitrogen through nitrogen fixation, nitrification, and nitrate reduction; and they drive the bulk of carbon, sulfur, iron, and manganese biogeochemical cycles.
In this regard, measurements of light stable isotopes in carbon dioxide, methane, and other atmospheric trace gases provide a unique means to better understand their sources, fates, and contributions in biogeochemical cycles.
Langen-felds of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation in Aspendale, Australia, and his colleagues in the Fall Global Biogeochemical Cycles.