Bioengineered Food


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Any food genetically modified to resist or tolerate pesiticides, insects, or viruses, or to decrease spoilage, produce antibodies, decrease fatty acid synthesis, or increase production of certain amino acids

food

Any material, including water, that provides the nutritive requirements of an organism to maintain growth and physical well-being. For humans, food includes carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, and minerals. See: carbohydrate; digestion; fat(2); nutrition; protein; stomach

bioengineered food

Genetically modified food.

food chain

See: chain

contamination of food

The presence, introduction, or development of infectious or toxic material in food. Food may be contaminated by chemical residues (such as pesticides), bacteria (Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Listeria), viruses (hepatitis A, Norwalk), protozoa (Giardia), worms (tapeworms and roundworms), molds (Aspergillus), or toxins (botulinum, staphylococcal enterotoxin).

convenience food

Food in which one or more steps in preparation have been completed before the product is offered for retail sale. Examples include frozen vegetables, bake mixes, heat-and-serve foods, and ready-to-eat foods.

dietetic food

Food in which the nutrient content has been modified for use in special diets, esp. for diabetics.

enriched food

A processed food that has lost nutrients during milling, grinding, pasteurization, or other processes and then had those nutrients added back to the marketed product. Two examples of vitamins commonly used in food enrichment are vitamins B1 and B2, thiamine and riboflavin, respectively.

fast food

Commercially available, ready-to-eat meals (such as hamburgers, hot dogs, pizza, fried chicken, or french fries) with a high fat content, little fiber, and minimal quantities of vitamins or calcium.

functional food

1. Food products with additives for which, following FDA approval, health claims can be made.
2. A food that has a defined health benefit for the person who consumes it.

genetically modified food

Any crop or agricultural product altered by biological engineering for drought resistance, increased growth, resistance to pests or pesticides, prolonged shelf-life, altered textures or flavors, or other economically or commercially desirable characteristics. Promoters of genetically modified foods point to their improved yields (which may have a beneficial impact on agricultural profits or world hunger). Opponents of genetic modification have raised concerns about its effects on ecosystems, human food allergies, and religious dietary laws.
Synonym: bioengineered food

junk food

A colloquial term for food that has limited nutritional value. Typically it refers to foods high in salt, sugar, fat, or calories with low nutrient content. These include most salted snack foods, candy, gum, most sweet desserts, fried fast food, and carbonated beverages.

medical food

A food formulated by the selective use of nutrients and manufactured for the dietary treatment of a specific condition or disease.

novel food

A nutritional source that has not been used in the past or one that has been made by a new manufacturing process, including, e.g., genetic modification.

organic food

A crop or animal product cultivated with specific guidelines that limit the use of petrochemicals, radiation, or genetically engineered technologies in its agriculture.

processed food

Raw food that has been adulterated or modified to increase its nutritional content or make it more palatable and easier to ship, to store, or to sell.

ready-to-use therapeutic food

Abbreviation: RUTF
A nutritional supplement consisting of a roasted, ground cereal and a roasted, ground legume, fortified with vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients. The cereal provides a source of carbohydrates; the legume, a source of protein. RUTFs are used to treat and prevent malnutrition in impoverished populations, esp. undernourished children.

risky food

Any food that is contaminated or more likely than most other foods to be contaminated with bacteria, carcinogens, or toxins.

textured food

Food products manufactured from various nutritional components made to resemble conventional protein-source foods in texture such as meat, seafood, or poultry.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among other things, the Secretary's regulations must "prohibit a food derived from an animal to be considered a bioengineered food solely because the animal consumed feed produced from, containing, or consisting of a bioengineered substance" and must "determine the amounts of a bioengineered substance that may be present in food, as appropriate, in order for the food to be a bioengineered food.
764 mandates that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) promulgate regulations establishing a mandatory disclosure regime for bioengineered foods.
1599, the Senate bill would mandate that any bioengineered food that completes the federal pre-market review not be treated as less safe or safer than a non-bioengineered conventional counterpart.
Currently, such reviews are required only when the bioengineered food is substantially different from its traditional counterpart or when it contains a known allergen.
From a strictly legal/regulatory viewpoint, any bioengineered food which may be grown is arguably "natural.
government to discourage then-pending Mexican legislation that would have imposed labeling requirements on bioengineered food.
That rule would require companies to notify FDA of their intent to market a bioengineered food crop, and provide the agency with scientific data demonstrating the crop to be safe to eat.
Only when a bioengineered food is substantially different or its nutritive value significantly different does FDA require that it be called by a different or modified name.
Companies working on a new bioengineered food will be encouraged to participate in a pre-submission consultation program, under which they would write to FDA and ask to consult about a bioengineered food.
He said that his membership supports FDA policy, which requires labeling if a bioengineered food presents a potential health effect.
Thus the new GMO labeling law is bound to signal to consumers that bioengineered foods are somehow bad.
To date, no evidence has supported an increased degree of allergenicity of bioengineered foods compared to their non-bioengineered counterparts.