biochemistry

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biochemistry

 [bi″o-kem´is-tre]
the chemistry of living organisms and of their chemical constituents and vital processes.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·chem·is·try

(bī'ō-kem'is-trē),
The chemistry of living organisms and of the chemical, molecular, and physical changes occurring therein.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biochemistry

(bī′ō-kĕm′ĭ-strē)
n.
1. The study of the chemical substances and vital processes occurring in living organisms; biological chemistry; physiological chemistry.
2. The chemical composition of a particular living system or biological substance: viral biochemistry.

bi′o·chem′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj. & n.
bi′o·chem′i·cal·ly adv.
bi′o·chem′ist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biochemistry

Fringe medicine
A term misused by a German homeopath, WH Schüssler, for the use of “tissue salts” to treat patients with alleged mineral deficiencies.

Chemistry
Physiologic chemistry—the chemistry of living cells, tissues, and organisms.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·chem·is·try

(bī'ō-kem'is-trē)
The chemistry of living organisms and of the chemical, molecular, and physical changes occurring therein.
Synonym(s): biologic chemistry, physiologic chemistry.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

biochemistry

The study of the chemical processes going on in living organisms, especially humans. Biochemistry is concerned, among other things, with the acceleration of biochemical processes by ENZYMES; with the chemical messengers of the body (HORMONES); with communication between cells at cell membranes; with the chemical processes which govern cell survival and reproduction; with the production of energy in cells; and with the processes of digestion of food and the way in which the resulting chemical substances are utilized for energy and structural purposes.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

biochemistry

the study of the chemistry of living organisms.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

bi·o·chem·is·try

(bī'ō-kem'is-trē)
The chem-istry of living organisms and of the chemical, molecular, and physical changes occurring therein.
Synonym(s): physiologic chemistry.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
1973 By transferring a gene from an African clawed toad into the DNA of a bacteria, biochemists Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer pioneer genetic engineering.
I have worked closely with clinical biochemists throughout the world, being a member of the Scientific Division of IFCC for 6 years.
In his new work, Slouching Towards Gomorrah: Modern Liberalism and American Decline, Bork pins his own anti-evolutionary attack on Darwin's Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution, a recent book by biochemist Michael Behe.
Beginning in 1937, the German-born British biochemist Hans Adolf Krebs (1900-1981) found two six-carbon acids, including the familiar citric acid, that also played a role.
The biochemists used the machine in order to analyze the effect of cigarette smoke on pulmonary surfactant the chemical compound that keeps air sacs in the lungs from sticking together each time air is exhaled--which the medical community in the late sixties considered a key to understanding a possible cause of emphysema.
I've picked him because he's a biochemist, so he understands what I tell him.
In 1930, however, the American biochemist John Howard Northrop (1891-1987) managed to crystallize, not a rather off-beat enzyme such as urease, but the very well-known digestive enzyme pepsin and showed it to be a protein.
To the skeptical eye of Shapiro, a biochemist at New York University, those explanations that have been offered look more like mythology than like science.
Biochemists have also modified inteins so that when they hack themselves from a protein, they leave the exposed protein ends susceptible to forming a bond with another protein.
Furthermore, the biochemists argue, a variety of ocean-based compounds, including dissolved salts, sulfur or iron, an ice cap, or a worldwide slick of naturally produced oil, could have supplemented this UV protection.
Now, an international team of biochemists and structural biologists has uncovered the active elements that allow one of the most important enzymes to convert a saturated fat into an unsaturated one.
So far, biologists and biochemists have done much of the work in describing self-assembly, says Whitesides.