signal transduction

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signal transduction

n.
The process by which a signal, such as a hormone or a change in the concentration of an ion, is converted into a biochemical response by means of the activation of a receptor on the surface or interior of a cell.

signal transduction

Biochemical conversion that is part of a process, such as the docking of hormone to receptor, stimulating cellular production of specific enzymes or other proteins.
See also: transduction

signal transduction

The common process by which the binding of a molecule to a receptor on a cell plasma membrane results in the transmission of a signal within the cell (second messenger) to trigger off a biochemical pathway in the cell.

signal transduction

control of cellular activity by way of an extracellular signal being transduced into an intracellular response. This involves a cell surface receptor that responds to an external signalling compound by carrying the signal across the cell membrane to influence intracellular activities, such as expression of the genome. For example, the compound may bind to the receptor, altering its conformation, and result in the activation of an intracellular protein by phosphorylation. This, in turn, can initiate the transduction pathway in the cell. Some signals to which cells respond are ANTIGENS, HORMONES, GROWTH FACTORS, and the availability of nutrients or toxic substances.
References in periodicals archive ?
The answer, it turns out, involves delicate interactions between biomechanical stress, or force, which living cells exert on one another, and biochemical signaling.
By controlling information flow through biochemical signaling and the flow of chemical energy through metabolism, biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life.
If it is a dangerous intruder, the TLR can also trigger the release of inflammatory substances via biochemical signaling pathways.
of Graz, Austria) summarize the early work in biochemical signaling by Otto Loewi (1873-1961), Henry Hallet Dale (1875-1968), and Wilhelm Feldberg (d.
Blood vessels maintain a balanced vasomotor tone mediated through biochemical signaling between endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (Moncada et al.