bioaccumulation factor


Also found in: Acronyms.

bioaccumulation factor

The ratio of the contaminant in an organism to the concentration in the ambient environment at a steady state, where the organism can take in the contaminant through ingestion with its food as well as through direct content.

bioaccumulation factor

Toxicology The concentration of a chemical in tissue divided by its concentration in the diet
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Bioaccumulation factor (BAF) is an index of the degree of accumulation of a contaminant in an organism relative to its environment.
Interseasonal comparisons of Cu bioaccumulation factor at each tissue (water-to-root; water-to-shoot; belowground parts-to-aboveground parts) revealed no significant difference at the same season.
Though the fruit is a good source of potassium (bioaccumulation factor = 14.90), it also hyper-accumulates nickel (bioaccumulation factor = 84.00) qualifying the fruit as an indicator of nickel pollution.
Gobas, "A review of bioconcentration factor (BCF) and bioaccumulation factor (BAF) assessments for organic chemicals in aquatic organisms," Environmental Reviews, vol.
Bioaccumulation factor (BAF) in wheat tissue was determined to investigate extent of Cd accumulation in wheat tissue.
The high bioaccumulation factor for chromium and zinc suggests that the concentration of these metal ions n as it sometimes serves as a harbourage or the fish species have poor mechanisms for digesting and eliminating these heavy metals.
PCB water solubilities are in the ppb range: A bioaccumulation factor of 274K in fish tissues, as mentioned above, demonstrates that minute quantities of PCBs dissolved in water can get into the food chain in significant concentrations.
The bioaccumulation factor (BAF) consists of ratios of the concentration of a given contaminant in biota (a particular metal concentration in fish muscle) to that in an abiotic media (water and food).
By comparing available measured data and model predictions to bioaccumulation criteria in Canada [i.e., bioconcentration factor (BCF) or bioaccumulation factor (BAF) [greater than or equal to] 5,000], approximately 1,240 organic chemicals on the DSL were identified as potentially bioaccumulative (Environment Canada 2006; Persistence and Bioaccumulation Regulations 2000).