pyrolysis

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py·rol·y·sis

(pī-rol'i-sis),
Decomposition of a substance by heat.
[pyro- + G. lysis, dissolution]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

py·rol·y·sis

(pī-rol'i-sis)
Decomposition of a substance by heat.
[pyro- + G. lysis, dissolution]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

py·rol·y·sis

(pī-rol'i-sis)
Decomposition of a substance by heat.
[pyro- + G. lysis, dissolution]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
van de Beld said this will be made possible due to the integration of a boiler and the use of bio-oil rather than solid biomass.
Bio-oil, derived from larch sawdust by fast pyrolysis in a fluidized bed reactor at 550[degrees]C for 2-3 s, was made at the Institute of Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass and Productive Use, Beijing Forestry University, China.
2014), and the second is to blend commercial PF resin with bio-oil to make resin blends (Asian et al.
The new member of the Bio-Oil family comes as a complement to the packages of 25ml, 60ml and 125ml already in the market.
Wet microalgae with high water content could be converted into crude bio-oil by thermally and hydrolytically decomposing the biomacromolecules such as protein and lipid into smaller compounds.
Bacteria that digests organic compounds breaks down organic acids in bio-oil produced from plant feedstocks.
Hameed, "Recent progress on catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass to high-grade bio-oil and bio-chemicals," Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, vol.
One drop of oil goes a long way." Bio-Oil, PS8.99 (www.boots.com) Nails need to 'breathe' to grow NOT so, says Ciate London creative director and founder Charlotte Knight.
The results showed that the maximum biochar product was obtained at 350C and 3 mm particle size while the highest bio-oil yield was attained at 450C and 2 mm particle size.
Green Gold -- Derived from plants, bio-oil can be processed into gasoline, diesel or other typical petroleum products such as plastics