biomechanics

(redirected from Bio-mechanic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to Bio-mechanic: biomechanical frame of reference

biomechanics

 [bi″o-mĕ-kan´iks]
the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-me-kan'iks),
The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics

(bī′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The study of the mechanics of a living body, especially of the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The mechanics of a part or function of a living body, such as of the heart or of locomotion.

bi′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
bi′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.

biomechanics

Etymology: Gk, bios + mechane, machine
the study of mechanical laws and their application to living organisms, especially the human body and its locomotor system. biomechanic, biomechanical, adj.

biomechanics

The application of mechanical laws to living structures, specifically to the locomotor system of the human body. Biomechanics provides a forum for solving many of the problems central to designing prosthetic devices with moving parts (e.g., artificial hips and knees), which must successfully address issues of fluid pressure, mechanical stress and friction.

biomechanics

Orthopedics The application of mechanical laws to living structures, especially to the musculoskeletal system and locomotion; biomechanics addresses mechanical laws governing structure, function, and position of the human body

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Thescience concerned with the mechanical principles of movement and forces in living organisms.
[G. bios, life + mēchanē, instrument]

biomechanics

the understanding of forces and their effects on (and by) the human body and implements.

biomechanics

relationship between external forces (e.g. body weight and external environment) and internal forces (e.g. active forces generated by muscle contraction and passive forces exerted on local structures by bones and joints) and the resultant effect of these forces on body movement

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Science concerned with action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.

biomechanics (bī´ōməkan´iks),

biomechanics

the application of mechanical laws to living structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nokes, Professor of clinical Bio-mechanics at Cardiff University, started as a crowd doctor first and then became a club doctor.
Currently in the process of completing her second course of teacher training (the first being at the Sivananda Institute in India) in the Anusara discipline at Triyoga in London, Emma bases her teaching approach on her background in shiatsu and bio-mechanics, as well as her wealth of yoga experience and practice.
To explore the current state of multiscale simulation and its application in medicine, mechanical and other engineers, and materials scientists cover multiscale simulation theory; patient-specific fluid-structure interaction modeling, simulation, and diagnosis; from cellular structure to tissues and organs; and bio-mechanics and materials of bones and collagens.
Through the blending of ancient wisdom and tradition with our current understanding of exercise physiology and bio-mechanics River of Tradition has created programs that are safe, invigorating and productive for students of all ages.
The tests, conducted independently, are line with a bio-mechanics investigation and a neurobiologist's report both privately commissioned by Sheila Blanco.
At five, his teacher was surprised by his knowledge of the bio-mechanics of all land, water and flying creatures in the prehistoric eras and realised he was gifted.
Closer to home, the University of Sunderland recently picked up a 3D motion capture suit for use in sports science, bio-mechanics and nurse training, and admitted to being impressed by the range of potential uses.
It is a sub-branch of bio-mechanics, which is an interdisciplinary study of biology, mechanics and electronics, with an aim to incorporate biological organs with electro-mechanical systems.
Call this bio-mechanics -- biologically inspired engineering principles.
Paul is the bio-mechanics genius with a PhD in the art, and Robert the computer guru.
His credentials allowing him to be admitted as an expert in the field of bio-mechanics were not challenged and most certainly would have been.

Full browser ?