biomechanics

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biomechanics

 [bi″o-mĕ-kan´iks]
the application of mechanical laws to living structures. See also kinesiology.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-me-kan'iks),
The science concerned with the action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biomechanics

(bī′ō-mĭ-kăn′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The study of the mechanics of a living body, especially of the forces exerted by muscles and gravity on the skeletal structure.
2. (used with a pl. verb) The mechanics of a part or function of a living body, such as of the heart or of locomotion.

bi′o·me·chan′i·cal adj.
bi′o·me·chan′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biomechanics

The application of mechanical laws to living structures, specifically to the locomotor system of the human body. Biomechanics provides a forum for solving many of the problems central to designing prosthetic devices with moving parts (e.g., artificial hips and knees), which must successfully address issues of fluid pressure, mechanical stress and friction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

biomechanics

Orthopedics The application of mechanical laws to living structures, especially to the musculoskeletal system and locomotion; biomechanics addresses mechanical laws governing structure, function, and position of the human body
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Thescience concerned with the mechanical principles of movement and forces in living organisms.
[G. bios, life + mēchanē, instrument]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bi·o·me·chan·ics

(bī'ō-mĕ-kan'iks)
Science concerned with action of forces, internal or external, on the living body.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Mentioning bio-mechanics as one of the main features of the course, Mudassar said: "If you don't understand the mechanics of bowling actions, you can't guide players which can result in major injuries; so this course specifically helps you learn minor details to prevent players from injuries."
On Twitter, one user asked: "You get your info from Kris Boyd?" Well-known bio-mechanics boffin Michael Stewart wouldn't let sleeping dogs lie at the weekend after he disagreed with the decision to award Rangers a penalty against Motherwell and send off Carl McHugh.
"It was really a curiosity-based question," remembers Cherian, who specialised in bio-mechanics of locomotion at Berkley.
KARACHI -- Banned from bowling in international matches, Pakistan's experienced all-rounder Mohammad Hafeez will undergo a bio-mechanics bowling test at the Loughborough University in England on April 17th.
LAHORE -- Pakistan all-rounder Mohammad Hafeez will undergo a bio-mechanics bowling test in England on April 17.
"So I'm surmising here from the general bio-mechanics, if you're going to hold a child, make a consciously violent movement with it, you're unlikely to pick it up by its feet."
A bio-mechanics laboratory is also being set up in Lahore, he said, adding shifting the entire set-up to Islamabad would be very difficult.
"He is a very, very fit boy naturally but he has been very unfortunate with injuries and that affects the bio-mechanics of your body at times, and that desire to be back on the pitch can bring you setbacks.
"But he is a very, very fit boy naturally but he has been very unfortunate with injuries and that effects the bio-mechanics of your body at times and that desire to be back on the pitch can bring you set-backs.
Teams from eight different schools of Doha presented their projects based on research on subjects such as diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, gene therapy & stem cell research, and diagnostic tools & bio-mechanics.
Ajmal's action was then assessed in a bio-mechanics lab in Brisbane, Australia which revealed he flexes his elbow up to 43 degrees for his off-spinner and 42 for his doosra.
Nokes, Professor of clinical Bio-mechanics at Cardiff University, started as a crowd doctor first and then became a club doctor.

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