bioethics

(redirected from Bio-ethics)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

bioethics

 [bi″o-eth´iks]
the application of ethics to the biological sciences, medicine, nursing, and health care. The practical ethical questions raised in everyday health care are generally in the realm of bioethics.

bioethics

/bio·eth·ics/ (-eth´iks) obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

(bī′ō-ĕth′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the ethical and moral implications of new biological discoveries and biomedical advances, as in the fields of genetic engineering and drug research.

bi′o·eth′i·cal adj.
bi′o·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

bioethics

[bī′ō·eth′iks]
Etymology: Gk, bios, life + ethos, the habits of humans or animals
obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

An evolving, multidisciplinary—ethics, philosophy and sociology—field of allied health care, which examines the impact of life sciences on society.

Issues of bioethics
Doctor-patient relationships, medical decision making, futility of medical care in certain patient groups, healthcare rationing, patients’ rights, physician-assisted suicide, involvement in cases that require unbiased patient advocacy.

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics

The study of the ethical and moral questions arising from the growing possible application of biological and genetic knowledge, especially in BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.

bioethics

a study of the ethical issues relating to biological, medical and other scientific research and applications. Bioethics considers the perceived risks and benefits of the technologies involved, and their impact on society The major principles on which ethical decision-making is based are: benevolence (doing good, acting in the best interests of an individual and of all, securing their well-being); non-maleficence (preventing harm); autonomy (acting in a way that maximizes freedom of choice for the individual); confidentiality (respecting privacy of information) and justice (treating all fairly, unless there are morally relevant differences between people).

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics,

n the study of social and moral issues raised in the field of biology, including medicine and dentistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
For bio-ethics to shift toward a Schopenhauerian ethics it would need a revolution from provision to propriety in its structure.
Father Paul Murray, a Glasgow-based member of the Catholic Church's bio-ethics committee, said the long-term effects of the pigs' birth were worrying.
Fox, a sociologist at the University of Pennsylvania, helped to create the disciplines of bio-ethics and the sociology of medicine in such path-breaking works as Experiments Perilous (1974) and Spare Parts (1992).
The company is being advised by a group of renowned experts in the fields of human genetics, genomics, bio-ethics and bioinformatics.
Fr Sean Doran, a former secretary of the Catholic Bishops Bio-Ethics Committee, said the campaign is regrettable.
He explained that the research activities are being carried out in KMU, particularly research workshops on Bio-Ethics, Research Symposium in order to provide a platform to the students of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa to strengthen their abilities in the field of health education and research work.
The international ecumenical working group on bio-ethics, which was established in 2001, needs the full institutional support of the WCC in order to reach its conclusions as quickly as possible.
What bothers me most is bio-ethics when scientists tell us we should put aside moral objections, for example, the manipulation of genes or the cloning of human life, because we must be at the cutting edge.
One underlying theme in these discussions was that problems of bio-ethics, including informed consent, are approached differently within different cultural contexts.
What are green chemistry, biomaterials, new medicines, bio-ethics, stem cells, Jeune Entreprise Innovante (young innovating company), sources of finance for companies, available grants, centres of excellence?
Cardinal Thomas Winning, chairman of the bio-ethics committee of the Bishops' Conferences of the UK and Ireland, said the bank, the first of its kind, offered possibilities which could prove greater than those in therapeutic cloning.
Such areas should include bio-ethics, sexual ethics, ethics of the media and of science, ethics in economy and politics.