Binswanger disease

Bin·swan·ger dis·ease

(bin'zwang-ĕr),
one of the causes of vascular dementia, in which there are many infarcts and lacunae in the white matter, with relative sparing of the cortex and basal ganglia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Bins·wan·ger dis·ease

(bin'swahng-er di-zēz')
One of the causes of multiinfarct dementia, in which there are many infarcts and lacunae in the white matter, with relative sparing of the cortex and basal ganglia.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Binswanger disease

A form of vascular dementia in which insufficient blood flow to focal areas of the white matter of the brain just beneath the cerebral cortex produces slow thinking, memory loss, unsteady gait and clumsiness, personality changes, altered behavior, and sometimes, urinary incontinence.
Synonym: Binswanger dementia; subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy; subcortical vascular dementia
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Binswanger,

Otto Ludwig, German neurologist, 1852-1929.
Binswanger dementia - Synonym(s): Binswanger disease
Binswanger disease - one of the causes of multiinfarct dementia, in which there are many infarcts and lacunes in the white matter, with relative sparing of the cortex and basal ganglia. Synonym(s): Binswanger dementia; Binswanger encephalopathy; encephalitis subcorticalis chronica; subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy
Binswanger encephalopathy - Synonym(s): Binswanger disease
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Rosenberg, "Long-term blood-brain barrier permeability changes in binswanger disease," Stroke, vol.
The corpus callosum, a unique whitte-matter tract: anatomic features that may explain sparing in Binswanger disease and resistance to the flow of fluid masses.
Diagnosis on discharge was: primary stroke, repeated brain stroke with neurologic sequelae, cerebral lacunarism, Binswanger disease, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, chronic alcoholism or brain atrophy of unknown etiology, all cases with brain CT-scan image of brain atrophy.
One of the patients, whose brain specimen was sent to rule out dementia, was found to have Binswanger disease. The overall autopsy rate for the period of the study was 20.14% (144/715).
Pearce's barrister, Nadine Radford QC, told the court a doctor believed Pearce had Binswanger disease. It is thought the condition was triggered by a seizure or stroke he suffered in 1992, which had resulted in a severe personality change.