binomial

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binomial

 [bi-no´me-al]
composed of two terms, e.g., names of organisms formed by combination of genus and species names.

bi·no·mi·al

(bī-nō'mē-ăl),
A set of two terms or names; in the probabilistic or statistical sense it corresponds to a Bernoulli trial.
See also: binary combination.
[bi- + G. nomos, name]

binomial

/bi·no·mi·al/ (bi-no´me-al) composed of two terms, e.g., names of organisms formed by combination of genus and species names.

binomial

(bī-nō′mē-əl)
adj.
Consisting of or relating to two names or terms.
n.
Biology A taxonomic name in binomial nomenclature.

bi·no′mi·al·ly adv.

binomial

[bīnō′mē·əl]
1 containing two names or terms.
2 the unique, two-part scientific name used to identify a plant. The first name is the genus; the second, the species. A designation of the variety may also follow to further differentiate the plant. Use of the binomial is the only reliable way to accurately specify a particular herb, since common names differ from region to region and a single common name may often denote several herbs that differ widely from one another.

binomial

adjective Referring to an organism’s binomen—i.e., its genus and species names.

bi·no·mi·al

(bī-nō'mē-ăl)
A set of two terms or names; in the probabilistic or statistical sense it corresponds to a Bernoulli trial.
[bi- + G. nomos, name]

binomial (bī·nōˑ·mē·l),

n the taxonomic name for plants that always consists of two parts: the genus, which is the first name and is always capitalized, and the species, which is the second name and is always lower-case. These names should be used instead of common names to avoid confusion in the identification of herbs. Also called
botanical name, Latin name, or
scientific name.

binomial

composed of two terms, e.g. names of organisms formed by combination of genus and species names.

binomial distribution
categorization of a group into two mutually exclusive subgroups, e.g. sick and not sick.
binomial population
a population which can be divided into a binomial distribution.
References in periodicals archive ?
Poisson and negative binomial regression models are different in regards to their assumptions of the mean and variance of the dependents variables, in the case of Poison model the assumption is the mean and variance of the distributions are equal i.
Some researchers have noted that count data for occurrence of diseases often have over dispersion so they have preferred to use negative binomial regression in those types of studies.
2005) proposed two alternatives to estimate the probability of success in binomial samples tainted with divergent observations.
In view of a scarcity of robust, zero-inflated methods to estimate binomial linear functions, current research is characterized by the proposal for an improvement of the Wald method applied to the intervallic binomial linear functions.
The negative binomial commune fixed effect estimations also suggest time to the hospital increase maternal mortality.
Based on this, we performed a zero inflated negative binomial (Table 4).
Furthermore, 5 students (12, 15, 16, 17, and 18) who were unable to multiply binomials using the standard method achieved success using the Vedic method.
For question 4 in each questionnaire the students were asked to supply the missing terms in two binomials that were multiplied together.
Binomial pairs involve set phrases such as "bread and butter" or "tables and chairs," where one ordering of the elements is preferred to the opposite ordering.
Thus, the question still remains: to what extent does phonology determine the orderings in binomial pairs?
Such a binomial system for species names would also have the advantage of clearly distinguishing between the species name written in italics (Measles morbillivirus) and the common, nonitalicized virus name, measles virus.
The next two subsections describe two members of this class, the Poisson-Bernoulli distribution and the negative binomial distribution.