binomial

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binomial

 [bi-no´me-al]
composed of two terms, e.g., names of organisms formed by combination of genus and species names.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·no·mi·al

(bī-nō'mē-ăl),
A set of two terms or names; in the probabilistic or statistical sense it corresponds to a Bernoulli trial.
See also: binary combination.
[bi- + G. nomos, name]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

binomial

(bī-nō′mē-əl)
adj.
Consisting of or relating to two names or terms.
n.
Biology A taxonomic name in binomial nomenclature.

bi·no′mi·al·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

binomial

adjective Referring to an organism’s binomen—i.e., its genus and species names.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·no·mi·al

(bī-nō'mē-ăl)
A set of two terms or names; in the probabilistic or statistical sense it corresponds to a Bernoulli trial.
[bi- + G. nomos, name]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The binomials in The Schoole are rarely subject to important editorial modifications, but several instances of structural or lexical replacements can be identified.
In Joanna Kopaczyk & Hans Sauer (eds.), Binomials in the history of English: Fixed and flexible.
Use of Poisson and negative binomial regression models depends on the nature of the distribution of the dependents variables [30].
Poisson and negative binomial regression models are different in regards to their assumptions of the mean and variance of the dependents variables, in the case of Poison model the assumption is the mean and variance of the distributions are equal i.e.
For the binomial distribution E([R.sub.ic])=[r.sub.i]p and Var([R.sub.ic])=[r.sub.i]p(1-p).
for determining the ordering of elements in "binomial pairs").
For many years, some plant virologists have been using an unofficial binomial system for referring to virus species (as well as to viruses).
A summary of the results in the first of the algebra questions (Q2--see Figure 1 for format), requiring students to multiply together two basic binomials, is given in Table 1.
A student should be tasked with multiplying several pairs of binomials in this way to support the concept of polynomial multiplication using the distributive property.
In order to correct this issue, we add a pooled zero inflated negative binomial estimation.
Even though the Poisson distribution is usually not appropriate when multiple admissions are possible, it can be useful as an approximation to the binomial distribution when [m.sub.j] is small and multiple admissions are not possible.