binomial nomenclature

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nomenclature

 [no´men-kla″chur]
terminology; a classified system of technical names, such as of anatomical structures or organisms.
binomial nomenclature the nomenclature used in scientific classification of living organisms in which each organism is designated by two latinized names (genus and species), both of which must always be used because species names are not necessarily unique. note: The genus name is always capitalized, the species name is not, and both are italicized, e.g., Escherichia coli. When a name is repeated the genus name may be abbreviated by its initial, e.g., E. coli.

lin·nae·an sys·tem of no·men·cla·ture

the system of nomenclature in which the names of species are composed of two parts, a generic name and a specific epithet (species name, in botany).
[Carl von Linné]

binomial nomenclature

n.
The scientific naming of species whereby each species receives a Latin or Latinized name of two parts, the first indicating the genus and the second being the specific epithet. For example, Juglans regia is the English walnut; Juglans nigra, the black walnut.

binomial nomenclature

The naming convention for living organisms in which each organism is identified by 2 names: genus (e.g., Pneumocystis) and species (e.g., jiroveci).

bi·no·mi·al no·men·cla·ture

(bī-nō'mē-ăl nō'mĕn-klā'chŭr)
Naming system in which each species of animal or plant has a name composed of two terms, one identifying the genus to which it belongs and the second the species.

binomial nomenclature

in this the FOVEA, an area of acute vision, is of particular importance. Binocular vision results in a stereoscopic or 3-D effect, the slightly different positions of the two eyes being important in that they view the object from slightly different angles.

binomial nomenclature

the basis of the present scientific nomenclature of animals and plants, each of which is given a generic name followed by a specific name, in Greek, Latin or often Latinized English. The generic name invariably has an initial capital letter, and the specific name, even if it is the name of a person, an initial small letter, both names being in italics, or underlined. Thus the robin is named Erithacus rubecula. All scientific names used before the publication of the 10th edition of LINNAEUS'S Systema Naturae (1758) are no longer applicable, and the names given since then have priority by date as a rule, the earliest name for an organism being given preference over others. Often the scientific name is followed by the name of the person allocating the name and the date, e.g. Erithacus rubecula (L.) 1766. L. is an abbreviation for Linnaeus, and the brackets indicate a change from the genus in which he originally placed it; where genera and species are redefined, change of generic name is allowable. The robin was originally named Motacilla rubecula L. 1766. Motacilla is now the genus including wagtails, a group not closely related to robins which were subsequently placed in the genus Erithacus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although we accept variation in pronunciation, we should not accept variation in the spelling of binomial names. Common spelling variants and the citation frequency (PubMed) of 4 organisms, Acinetobacter baumannii, Coccidioides immitis (the fungal causal agent of coccidioidomycosis), Coxiella burnetii (the causal agent of Q fever), and Tropheryma whipplei (the causal agent of Whipple disease), are detailed in the Table.
Authors should be aware that previous taxonomic spelling of binomial names exist and check their historic evolution in the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature (www.bacterio.cict.fr).
Therefore, any "motivations" pres ent in these aphorisms represent motivations Linnaeus had for using polynomial nomina specifica, not binomial names. Indeed, some of these motivations are outdated, and Linnaeus's polynomial phrase names have been accordingly abandoned.
The new ICTV Executive Committee established at the 12th International Congress of Virology, held in Paris in July 2002, will decide in the near future if binomial names of virus species should be introduced.
Traditional binomial names, if used, would no longer reflect a genus and specific epithet and could be replaced with uninomials.