binocular disparity


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binocular disparity

The cue for depth perception which results from the difference in the position of images that each eye has of a given object; the closer the image, the greater the disparity, which creates the impression of depth.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Taira, "Information processing of geometrical features of a surface based on binocular disparity cues: An fMRI study," Neuroscience Research, vol.
To improve Zhao's model, a modified BJND model is presented with the consideration of binocular disparity. Given the left and right views of stereo image with the disparity image corresponding to left view, by incorporating the models of the binocular combination of injected noises, luminance, and contrast masking effects, a BJND at the right view is defined as follows:
Excluding binocular information by means of imposing a monocular viewing condition, thus preventing the effectiveness of binocular disparity and fusional vergence information, increased the RSME intrinsic to visual space.
Han et al., "fMRI analysis of excessive binocular disparity on the human brain," International Journal of Imaging Systems and Technology, vol.
So, the different aspects of the visuo-motor coordination are integrated: an active vision system, composed of two vergent cameras, a module for the estimation of 2D binocular disparity, and a robotic actuator to perform reaching tasks.
There, images on the screen are filtered so that each eye sees a slightly different perspective - known as binocular disparity - fooling the brain into perceiving depth.
Two other distance cues, binocular disparity and motion perspective, are effective distance cues in action space.
As a solution, binocular disparity can be used since it provides absolute distances by triangulating the distance to an object.
Although the finding of a subitizing function in the enumeration task, regardless of the type of motion used, suggests that any motion-defined target stimuli can be perceptually segregated from distractors, it was still the case that performance was consistently better for stimuli presented with binocular disparity information.
When the various spatial frequency components in an image have the same binocular disparity, cooperative interactions can occur, as demonstrated by Rohaly and Wilson (1993) and by the present study.
Given two input images, [I.sub.L](x,y) and [I.sub.R](x,y), the goal of disparity estimation is to find an optimal binocular disparity [d.sub.L](x, y) so that the two images match as closely as possible:
This is called binocular disparity - when you alternate between closing your left and right eye, objects appear to jump back and forth.