Bingham plastic


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Bing·ham plas·tic

(bing'ăm),
a material that, in the idealized case, does not flow until a critical stress (yield stress) is exceeded, and then flows at a rate proportional to the excess of stress over the yield stress; real materials probably only approach this ideal model.

Bingham,

E.C., U.S. chemist, 1878-1945.
Bingham flow - the flow characteristics exhibited by a Bingham plastic.
Bingham model - a model representing the flow behavior of a Bingham plastic, in the idealized case.
Bingham plastic - a material that, in the idealized case, does not flow until a critical stress (yield stress) is exceeded, and then flows at a rate proportional to the excess of stress over the yield stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
For a Bingham plastic, [mu] and [alpha] are given in terms of [theta] by Equations (2) and (3), and Equation (13) becomes:
Thus, f for a turbulent flow of a Bingham plastic can be determined directly from Equation (15) (with Equation (16) substituted in, if required).
A third point illustrated by Figure 3 is that the turbulent flow of a Bingham plastic tends to show remarkably small variations in f for large changes in flow velocity.
For the commonly-used two-parameter Bingham plastic model, the old Hedstrom technique overestimates friction losses.
The Turbulent Flow of Bingham Plastic Fluids in Smooth Circular Pipes," Int.
An extended version of the model will be used below to analyze turbulent flow and the laminar-turbulent transition for pipeline flows of Bingham plastics.
In this regard, noteworthy agreement for various Bingham plastics has been found by other authors including Xu et al.
The basic relationships for the present analytic model of laminar-turbulent transition for pipeline flow of Bingham plastics have been presented in the previous sections as Equations (7) and (15) (with the substitution of Equation (16)) plus the condition for [rho]VD/[[mu].
Later, Malin (1997) applied both k-[epsilon] and k-[omega] modelling to turbulent pipe flow of Bingham plastics.
The Wilson-Thomas model, which does account for viscouslayer thickening, has now been applied to the prediction of the transition point for Bingham plastics.