binge drinking

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binge drinking

n.
Consumption of a large number of alcoholic beverages within a short period of time.
An early phase of chronic alcoholism, characterised by episodic ‘flirtation’ with the bottle by binges of drinking to the point of stupor, followed by periods of abstinence. Binge drinking is accompanied by alcoholic ketoacidosis—accelerated lipolysis—and beta-hydroxybutyric acid production due to impaired insulin secretion, decreased food consumption and recurrent vomiting

binge drinking

An early phase of chronic alcoholism, characterized by episodic 'flirtation' with the bottle by binges of drinking to the point of stupor, followed by periods of abstinence; BD is accompanied by alcoholic ketoacidosis–accelerated lipolysis and β-hydroxybutyric acid production due to impaired insulin secretion, ↓ food consumption and recurrent vomiting. See 'Eyeopener. '.

binge drinking

The practice of drinking excessive amounts of alcohol regularly. A binge has been defined as a pattern of drinking that brings the blood alcohol level to 80 mg per 100 ml (0.08 per cent) or more. A 2003 British Government report indicates that binge drinking in the UK has risen markedly in recent years, especially among young people and that the problem is markedly more severe in the UK than in other European countries. Nearly 20 per cent of the total alcohol taken is consumed by underage drinkers.

Patient discussion about binge drinking

Q. BINGE DRINKING can binge drinking cause death?

A. Yes. Excessive immediate alcohol consumption (i.e. drinking a lot of alcohol during a short time) can lead to a coma and death. Moreover, even smaller amounts may cause death indirectly through risk taking (i.e. RECKLESS) behavior such as driving while drinking, fights etc.

More discussions about binge drinking
References in periodicals archive ?
7% of current drinkers who did not binge drink usually obtained alcohol from someone who gave it to them.
People binge drink and mess up the rest of their lives and they could have done something so much better but they made the wrong decision.
Highly motivated students may be less likely to binge drink because they believe that drinking may interfere with their studies.
Previous research consistently provides evidence to suggest that male college students are more likely to binge drink than their female peers (NIAAA, 2002).
When binge drinking frequency is broken down by age group, those aged between 16 and 29 were more likely to binge drink, and to do so frequently, than their younger counterparts (77% of 16-29-year-olds binge, compared with only 47.
As these descriptive statistics show, adolescents who binge drink at any point in the last year receive significantly lower grades (columns 3 and 6) and have higher suspension rates (column 9) and unexcused absence (column 12) rates than nonbinge drinkers (8) However, for three of the four outcome measures, these mean differences do not differ by gender.
In the United States, two out of every five college students regularly binge drink.
Thirty-nine percent of college women binge drink within a two-week period; 50 percent of college men binge drink.
Although binge drinking is more prevalent among men (15), women who binge drink are at high risk for alcohol-attributable harms, in part because they differ from men in their physiologic response to alcohol consumption.
For example, 70% of the boys who said they were likely to binge drink chose Coors as their favorite brand.
3% of them reported frequent binge drinking (more than three episodes of binge drink in the last two weeks) in the previous two weeks, which is much higher than the national average (76.
Dr Nicola Shelton, of University College London, told the annual conference of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) in Manchester that generally women binge drink on wine and men on beer.