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binding

(bīnd'ing),
The perceptual connection between aspects of a visual experience, such that the color of a moving object appears to be unified with the object (for example, whereas movement and color are processed in different brain regions).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

binding

The specific adherence of a molecule to one or more others, which reflects complementarity between between them—e.g., enzymes binding to substrates; antibodies to antigens; DNA to complementary strands of nucleic acids.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bind·ing

(bīnd'ing)
The perceptual connection between aspects of a visual experience, such that the color of a moving object appears to be unified with the object (e.g., whereas movement and color are processed in different brain regions).
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about binding

Q. My friend has Progressive MS, he is bound to a wheelchair, Prognosis? How can I help? He must be moved by a Hoyer Lift, he has caregivers. He has a beautiful voice and does have enough ability to move in his chair around local community. He has some bad days with spacicity, I want to help but am unsure as to how? He is 60? or so and lives on his own, he has had MS for many years and a number of complications, such as pneumonia and decubitus. Please help me to help him!

A. There are a number of ideas and resources for social and recreational activities (i.e. wheelchair sports, dancing, travel, aviation, etc.) that may be helpful, which can be found at www.mobility-advisor.com.

More discussions about binding
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References in periodicals archive ?
Piece bias strips to achieve the necessary length for binding the desired edges.
With wrong sides together, fold the binding strip in half lengthwise; press (10).
Kinsella highlights the ambiguity inherent when interpreting bookbinder's tickets that advertise binding and bookselling enterprises as it is unclear whether "tickets signify the work of a binder or the sale of a bookseller" (27).
There are minor inconsistencies in the binding descriptions which are not clarified in any prefatory notes.
A number of the bindings in Marsh's had been chained to tables but the chains were removed in 1762-63 and marks of the old furniture remain.
She reminds us that the binding of books (except for some very popular titles that might be bound in soft utilitarian parchment or paper covers) was the responsibility of the buyer.
We purified mocarhagin from the crude venom of the snake Naja mossambica mossambica for its heparin binding properties according to De Luca et al.
Moreover, although fibrinogen is essential for Ni[Cl.sub.2]-induced platelet aggregation, it is not required for Ni[Cl.sub.2]-induced platelet activation, expressed as [p60.sup.src] phosphorylation, as demonstrated by the fact that such response is not inhibited by the incubation with the tetrapeptide RGDS (120 [micro]g/mL), which prevents fibrinogen binding to its receptor, the integrin [Alpha]IIb[Beta]3 (8).
Affinity of the [[sup.3]H]-8-OH-DPAT binding to rat brain membranes
The curve of the [[sup.3]H]-8-OH-DPAT binding to rat hippocampal membranes was with a high affinity and saturable (Fig.
There are no standards for adhesive binding quality of certain books category.
Adhesion strength determines intensity of molecular forces in the adhesive binding. Adhesion primarily depends on the force in the transition region between the non-contacting areas (Avaja et al., 2009).