binary

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binary

 [bi´nah-re]
1. made up of two elements or parts.
2. denoting a number system with a base of two.

bi·na·ry

(bī'nār-ē),
1. Comprising two components, elements, molecules, or other feature.
2. Denoting a choice of two mutually exclusive outcomes for one event (for example, male or female, heads or tails, affected or unaffected).
[L. binarius, consisting of two, fr. bini, two at a time]

binary

/bi·na·ry/ (bi´nah-re)
1. made up of two elements or of two equal parts.
2. denoting a number system with a base of two.

binary

adjective Consisting of or characterised by 2 parts, pieces, or things.

bi·na·ry

(bī'nar-ē)
1. Comprising two components, elements, molecules, or other factor or quality.
2. Denoting a choice of two mutually exclusive outcomes for one event (e.g., male or female, heads or tails, affected or unaffected).
[L. binarius, consisting of two, fr. bini, two at a time]
References in periodicals archive ?
The advance represents an important step toward the development of quantum computers, in which the binary logic of 0s and 1s used in conventional computers is replaced by computing elements that follow the laws of quantum mechanics (SN: 1/14/95, p.
Neural networks focus on simulating the high connectivity between huge numbers of cells that characterize the human brain, while fuzzy logic aims at developing multivalued rather than binary logic that can simulate human response to continuous rather than discrete choices.
They bravely battled against the Manichaean master narratives of moder n sovereignty, Hardt and Negri concede, unsettling the binary logic of "Self and Other, white and black, inside and outside, ruler and ruled.
Page's reading of Jazz argues that such Derridean concepts as the differance, the trace, and the breach are useful in understanding specific characters (55), as well as the way the novel enacts an alternative to the either/or trap of Western, binary logic (65).
For computation, the opened or closed positions of these gates represent the ones or zeros of binary logic.

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