alloy

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alloy

 [al´oi]
a solid mixture of two or more metals, or of one or more metals and certain metalloids, that are mutually soluble in the molten condition.

al·loy

(al'oy),
A combination of metals formed when they are miscible in the liquid state.

alloy

A substance having metallic properties and being composed of two or more chemical elements, at least one of which is a metal.

al·loy

(al'oy)
A substance composed of a mixture of two or more metals.

al·loy

(al'oy)
A combination of metals formed when they are miscible in the liquid state.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, another limitation of this study was the use of a Ti-13Zr binary alloy in an animal model, which differs from the Ti-15Zr characterised and used in the finite element analysis.
It is shown clearly that the cell volume V expands for either martensite or austenite with Nd addition to Ni-Ti binary alloy from 0 at.% to 20 at.%.
Figure 1 shows the XRD patterns of Pd-Si binary alloys. The diameter of the spherical [Pd.sub.81][Si.sub.19] sample is about 10 mm while the diameter of the [Pd.sub.80][Si.sub.20] glassy ball is around 8 mm.
In a typical Al-Zn binary alloy microstructure rich in Al that solidifies under normal cooling rates, primary Al dendrites containing dissolved zinc are surrounded by interdendritic regions containing zinc solid solution.
Kacprzak, Binary Alloy Phase Diagrams, ASM International, 2nd edition, 1990.
Taking into consideration the whole temperature range between the melting temperature of the pure reference element (Si or Al) and the corresponding eutectic temperature of an observed binary alloy (Al-Si or Mg-Al), the following relationship can be established between [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and the concentration of the alloying element [X.sub.i]:
Baker, Binary Alloy Phase Diagram, 2nd edition, 1986.
[11] also carried out similar investigations on Pb-Si binary alloy; it is shown that hardness increases with decreasing the cooling rate.
Among copper alloys, many binary alloys, such as Cu-Ag [2, 3], Cu-Zr [4, 5], Cu-Sn [6, 7], Cu-Mg [8, 9], and Cu-Cr [10-12] have been widely investigated and utilized in a variety of electrical and electronic applications, including electrical energy transmission.
Muller and Galvele [14] studied the role of alloying elements in pitting corrosion of Al-Zn, Al-Cu, and Al-Mg binary alloys in 1 M NaCl.
There seems to be little basic difference between the mechanism of precipitation in simple binary alloys and in those containing a third addition.