Wilder

(redirected from Billy Wilder)
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Wil·der

(wīld'ĕr),
Helenor C., U.S. ophthalmologist and pathologist, 1895-1998. See: Wilder stain for reticulum.

Wil·der

(wīld'ĕr),
Joseph F., U.S. neuropsychiatrist, 1895-1976.

Wil·der

(wīld'ĕr),
William H., U.S. ophthalmologst, 1860-1935. See: Wilder sign.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It's about film, and how Billy Wilder and Raymond Chandler changed filmmaking.
Hal Ashby and Billy Wilder are two prominent Hollywood directors whom critics often exclude from the pantheon of auteur filmmakers.
Aiming to "further correct the lack of scholarship" on filmmaker Billy Wilder (1906-2002), McNally (film studies, London Metropolitan U., UK) presents a collection of 16 papers arranged into four sections offering in-depth analyses of Wilder's works.
Pitch-perfect direction from one of Hollywood's holiest, Billy Wilder. A snigger-sprinkled script, co-written by Wilder, about Prohibition gangsters giving chase to a couple of journeymen jazz musicians.
The dashing star - who will forever be remembered for his role in drag in the 1959 Billy Wilder comedy Some Like It Hot - suffered a heart attack.
"The man who made it, Billy Wilder, did not suffer fools so for Tony Curtis to work with him and make that film shows just how good he was.
Enchanted by the aesthetic that defined American cinema of the 1940s and "50s, Sharon Okun's new paintings explore the imagery and themes that infuse the artwork of Edward Hopper as much as they permeate the films of Billy Wilder and Alfred Hitchcock.
"That's the press baby, the press and there is nothing you can do about it....nothing!"* "The Paper." There's a very quick scene in passing in the newsroom when one reporter annoyingly calls out, "How do you spell ..." and a copy editor turns and yells, "Look it UP!"*"Ace in the Hole" -- Billy Wilder's 1951 film in which a washed-up big city newsman (Kirk Douglas), now working for a small paper in Albuquerque, tries to regain fame by exploiting a local story about a man trapped in a cave.
The "Mystery of Film Noir" seminar continues on Sunday with films by Alfred Hitchcock and Billy Wilder.
Who was described by film-maker Billy Wilder as "Hollywood's Joan of Arc, our ultimate sacrificial lamb."?
Director Billy Wilder deliberately set Some Like It Hot in the 1920s because, as cowriter I.A.L.
Sugar is a musical version of the classic Billy Wilder comedy Some Like It Hot, in which two male Prohibition-era musicians witness a gangland shooting and flee by putting on drag and travelling to Florida with an all-girl band.