bilberry

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Related to Bilberries: whortleberry, Winberry

bilberry

/bil·ber·ry/ (bil´ber-e) the leaves and fruit of Vaccinium myrtillus, having astringent and antidiarrheal effects, used topically for inflammation, burns, and skin diseases, and orally for gout, arthritis, dermatitis, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal, urinary tract, and kidney disorders.

bilberry

(bĭl′bĕr′ē)
n.
1.
a. A low-growing deciduous shrub (Vaccinium myrtillus) of the heath family native to Eurasia and western North America, having edible bluish-black berries borne singly or in pairs, used for making jams, jellies, and juice and for medicinal purposes.
b. Any of several similar plants of the genus Vaccinium.
2. The fruit of any of these plants.

bilberry

an herb found in the central, Northern, and Southeastern regions of Europe.
uses This herb is used for diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, glaucoma, cataract, capillary fragility, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, and mild diarrhea; possibly effective for some indications but controlled clinical trials do not support its use for improving vision.
contraindications Bilberry should not be used during pregnancy and lactation or in children until more research is available.

bilberry

Herbal medicine
A shrub, the berries of which contain anthocyanosides; bilberry is said to prevent atherosclerosis, and has been used internally for eye problems (cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, myopia, night blindness, diabetes) and GI complaints (colic, constipation, diarrhoea, hypertension), and externally for burns, haemorrhoids, dermatitis, spider nevi and varicose veins.

bil·ber·ry

(bil'ber-ē)
Agent derived from dried fruit of Vaccinum myrtillus; studies suggest value in cardiovascular disease; also used to treat optic disorders; anecdotal reports claimuse improved vision.
Synonym(s): European blueberry, huckleberry, whortleberry.

bilberry (bilˑ·berˈ·ē),

n Latin name:
Vaccinium myrtillus; parts used: berries; uses: antioxidant, vasoprotection, glaucoma, cataracts, myopia, diabetic retinopathy, varicose veins, hemorrhoids, venous insufficiency, antidiabetic actions; enhances night vision; prevents macular degeneration; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, those taking anticoagulant medications, antiplate-let medications, aspirin, insulin, NSAIDs, antidiabetic medications. Also called
bog bilberries, European blueberries, huckleberries, or
whortleberries.
References in periodicals archive ?
The number of bilberries m-3 foliage differed significantly among the three inventories in both years (2000: H = 18.
BERRYLICIOUS: Bilberries which in my view, make pie, heaven
Only pick bilberries if you are sure you have correctly identified them - mistakes could be dangerous to your health
Two of the negative trials with low doses both used tablets formulated from Swedish bilberries.
But the bilberries are all over the place and I managed to browbeat the family into collecting some.
According to bilberry supplier, Linnea, Locarno, Switzerland, the medicinal properties of bilberries have been known since the Middle Ages.
At present, raw materials of Chinese bilberries are imported and home-made.
After watching a football match in a pub they moved on to Bilberries, where Meek also went after watching the same match at another pub.
Plants used in the tests included grapes, radishes, purple corn, chokeberries, bilberries, purple carrots and elderberries.
These delicious deep blue berries, which can be added to summer pudding and other red fruit desserts, are related to the wild, moorland bilberries, but form bushes rather than low, straggly plants.
I used to come and look at the view, and pick bilberries, but I never thought I would ever live here.
Bilberries are usually found on hillsides and are fruiting now.