film

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film

 [film]
1. a thin layer or coating.
2. a thin sheet of material (e.g., gelatin, cellulose acetate) specially treated for use in photography or radiography; used also to designate the sheet after exposure to the energy to which it is sensitive.
bite-wing film an x-ray film with a protruding tab to be held between the upper and lower teeth, used for a bite-wing radiograph of oral structures.
gelatin film, absorbable a sterile, nonantigenic, absorbable, water-insoluble coating used as an aid in surgical closure and repair of defects in the dura mater and pleura and as a local hemostatic.
spot film a radiograph of a small anatomic area obtained either by rapid exposure during fluoroscopy to provide a permanent record of a transiently observed abnormality, or by limitation of radiation passing through the area to improve definition and detail of the image produced. See also spot-film radiography.
x-ray film film sensitized to x-rays, either before or after exposure.
Cross-sectional view of radiographic film. The bulk of the film is the base. The emulsion contains the diagnostic information. From Bushong, 2001.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

film

(film),
1. A thin sheet of flexible material coated with a light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used in taking photographs or radiographs.
2. A thin layer or coating.
3. A radiograph (colloq.).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

film

(fĭlm)
n.
1. A light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used in taking photographs or radiographs.
2. A thin layer or membranous coating.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

film

(film)
1. A thin sheet of flexible material coated with a light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used in taking photographs or radiographs.
2. A thin layer or coating.
3. Colloquially, a radiograph.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

film

(film)
1. Thin sheet of flexible material coated with a light-sensitive or x-ray-sensitive substance used for radiographs.
2. A radiograph (colloq.)
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A big screen and deck chairs have been set up and shoppers are already taking a break, having a seat, and relaxing in the sunshine on Tuesdays and Thursdays at noon and 5pm, and on Sundays at 11am and 3pm.
Turning to bigger screens in smartphones is game over for the dominant strategy of phone manufacturers a few years back, when critics would mock devices with big screens, jesting that they will not click as they won't fit in pockets of tight jeans; or because people were reluctant to be seen carrying big gadgets.
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As LOCOG said after the Games: "The Big Screens programme has been universally recognised as the key element in delivering the Singapore Promise to engage with all Nations & Regions of the UK at Games time."
I saw her in London and now I've seen her on the big screen. She's amazing, phenomenal."
LIVERPOOL One's big screen is set for a splendid summer of sport and culture.
Summary: She's best known for her musical efforts with her sister AJ, but expect to see more of Aly Michalka on the big screen.
It won't be on the big screen for long, so see it while you can.
Ever elusive and so very quietly spoken, Adrianne Lopez makes another appearance upon ze big screen. His--how do you Americans say--uh, raw and gritty prowess is always a pleasure to watch on the big screen.
"When we did Chicago, no movie musical had been made for the big screen in years," he says of the Best Picture Oscar winner for 2002, which he and Meron executive-produced.
Both Gross and Smith are leapfrogging to the big screen from television.