big-ticket item

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big-ticket item

A popular term for a relatively costly product or service.

BTIs (e.g., coronary artery bypass surgery) have a direct impact on healthcare costs since they are performed with much less frequency than “little-ticket” items.

big-ticket item

Managed care A popular term for an expensive therapeutic or diagnostic procedure
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Big ticket items, along with high SKU counts of low cost accessories sourced directly from Asia, require an integrated approach to supply chain management and accurate visibility.
Take advantage of the section 179 deduction of up to $105,000 for fax machines, computers and other big ticket items.
World events slowed the travel business during the first half of the year, but the year has finished strong--especially for big ticket items like cruises and vacation packages," said AAA Travel Vice President Sandra Hughes.
These units include Installment Finance, which enable families to purchase big ticket items such as automobiles, appliances or computers, and pay fees in monthly installments; Consumer Loans, which include loan programs designed for specific demographic groups, such as students or newlyweds; Leasing Services to credit worthy companies; and New Technology investing services, for infusion of capital for fledgling companies with solid business models.
She added that many homeowners had been using their homes "as though they were ATM machines" to pay off credit cards and buy big ticket items like automobiles.
According to Michael Nguyen, CEO and President of Nettel Holdings, "We keep a watchful eye on spending habits while acquiring state of the art features whereas others companies tend to buy big ticket items without blinking an eye.
Credit is on people's mind for a lot of reasons, from budgeting your family's Christmas gift shopping for December, to planning for big ticket items like home refinancing or buying a 2003 automobile.
Just over one quarter of Americans (27%) say they would reduce their use of credit cards to make major purchases of big ticket items such as autos, furniture and education if America goes to war with Iraq, according to the results of a nationwide survey by the Cambridge Consumer Credit Index.