Bifidobacteria


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Bifidobacteria

(bī″fĭd-ō-băk-tēr′ē-ă) [″ + ″]
Pl. of Bifidobacterium.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Bifidobacteria

A group of bacteria normally present in the intestine. Commercial supplements containing these bacteria are available.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bifidobacteria: Ecology and Coevolution With the Host.
The new findings suggest that maintaining high levels of Bifidobacteria, either naturally or via probiotic supplementation, may help reduce levels of AMR-related genes.
Bifidobacteria is touted as the hardworking bacteria that inhabits the colon and intestines to improve digestion.
Probiotic-supplemented milk formula (milk supplemented with Bifidobacteria) were not significantly affecting IgG antibody titers (42).
As children, our bodies have an abundance of bifidobacteria. But with age, poor diet, and antibiotic use, levels of bifidobacteria decline.
Fecal Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus are significantly decreased in IBS-D patients compared to healthy controls (p < 0.05) (Table 2).
In addition to inhibition of pathogens, milk oligosaccharides also appear to stimulate the growth of various other bifidobacteria which are quite commonly found in the feces of breastfed infants.
Survival rates percentage of bifidobacteria was calculated according to [20].
Above all, bifidobacteria play an essential role in the prevention of pathogen microorganisms infection and in the regulation of the intestinal flora due to its probiotic properties.
The main types of beneficial bacteria (probiotics) encouraged by prebiotics are Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli, also the most commonly used probiotics in foods, such as yogurt and supplements.
PreticX increases Bifidobacteria at a low dosage and has a preferable tolerance profile.