hydralazine

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hydralazine

 [hi-dral´ah-zēn]
an antihypertensive agent and vasodilator, administered orally, intramuscularly, or intravenously as the hydrochloride salt in treatment of peripheral vascular disease, essential and early malignant hypertension, thrombophlebitis, and other conditions in which dilation of blood vessels of the extremities is desired. Dosage is adjusted to the individual patient's response. blood pressure should be checked frequently, especially during parenteral administration. Side effects are rare with therapeutic doses, but the drug must be administered with caution to patients with coronary artery disease, advanced kidney damage, and existing or incipient stroke syndrome.

hydralazine

(hī-drăl′ə-zēn′)
n.
An antihypertensive drug, C8H8N4.

hydralazine

Therapeutics A vasodilator which, with isosorbide dinitrate, is a 2nd line therapy in Pts with CHF for whom ACE inhibitors are contraindicated. See Congestive heart failure.

hydralazine

A drug that causes arteries to widen (vasodilatation) and can be used as an adjunct to the treatment of high blood pressure (HYPERTENSION) and moderate degrees of HEART FAILURE. It is seldom used alone. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Apresoline.
References in periodicals archive ?
(6.) Jonathan Kahn, Race in a Bottle: The Story of BiDil and Racialized Medicine in a Post-Genomic Age 21, 90 (Columbia Univ.
Hunt, BiDil: Assessing a Race-Based Pharmaceutical, 4 Ann.
My discussion of BiDil seeks to reframe the disparity in incidence of heart disease--a problem that is too often moralized and technologized--as a social and political problem by focusing on the ways in which science and technology produce material shifts that become intelligible through narratives and social discourses that appear as inevitable discoveries rather than as components of larger political projects.
Stockbridge, supra note 141, at 57-61 (defending FDA approval of BiDil,
The search term "BiDil" yielded 167 articles in total, of which 105 were accepted for inclusion.
Kahn, "BiDil: Race Medicine or Race Marketing?" Health Affairs, W5-455 to W5-463, 2005.
"Two large heart failure studies using two distinct formulations showed different results in decreasing mortality, only BiDil has shown significant reductions in death and hospitalization in black heart failure patients, as seen in A-HeFT.
Some experts have concluded that a good response to BiDil has more to do with attributes and genes than it does with racial identity.
One example of a medicine targeted at racial categories is BiDil (fixed-dose isosorbide dinitrate and hydralazine), a heart failure drug that was approved specifically for use in blacks.
Despite the truism that biological race does not exist, in recent decades we have seen significant growth in race-based research (see Abraham, 2005), racial genetic counselling and testing (e.g., Myriad Genetics Laboratories' recent success at obtaining a patent for their Ashkenazi-specific [BRCA.sub.2] test), and even race-specific pharmaceuticals (e.g., BiDil).
The manufacturers of this new drug, BiDil, believe there must also be some that work better for blacks.
Morever, Nebivolol, a beta-blocker drug currently under review at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has shown promise in reducing hypertension in African American patients and BiDil (combination of isisorbide dinitrate and hydralize) has recently been approved as a heart failure medication for African Americans.