ligand

(redirected from Bidentate ligand)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Bidentate ligand: tridentate ligand

ligand

 [li´gand, lig´and]
an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or molecule that reacts to form a complex with another molecule.

lig·and

(lig'and, lī'gand),
1. Any individual atom, group, or molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds, for example, the porphyrin portion of heme, the corrin nucleus of the B12 vitamins.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element, for example, a radioisotope.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule, for example, a ligand binding to a receptor.
4. The analyte in competitive binding assays, such as radioimmunoassay.
5. An atom or group covalently attached to a specified carbon atom in an organic molecule.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

/li·gand/ (li´gand) (lig´and) an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or molecule that reacts to form a complex with another molecule.

ligand

(lī′gənd, lĭg′ənd)
n.
An ion, molecule, or molecular group that binds to another chemical entity to form a larger complex.

ligand

[lig′ənd, lī′gənd]
Etymology: L, ligare, to bind
1 a molecule, ion, or group bound to the central metal atom of a chemical compound, such as the oxygen molecule in oxyhemoglobin, which is bound to the central iron atom.
2 an organic molecule attached to a specific site on a cell surface or to a tracer element. The binding is reversible in a competitive binding assay. It may be the analyte or a cross-reactant. Examples include vitamin B12, a ligand with intrinsic factor as the binding protein, and various antigens, which are ligands with antibody-binding proteins.

li·gand

(lī'gand)
1. An organic molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element, e.g., a radioisotope.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule, e.g., a ligand binding to a receptor.
4. The analyte in competitive binding assays, such as radioimmunoassay.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

A MOLECULE or ION that binds to a central chemical entity by non-covalent bonds. A general term for any molecule that is recognized by a surface receptor.

ligand

a molecule able to bind to a specific ANTIBODY and used to distinguish closely similar types of antibody.

li·gand

(lī'gand)
1. Any individual atom, group, or molecule attached to a central metal ion by multiple coordinate bonds.
2. An organic molecule attached to a tracer element.
3. A molecule that binds to a macromolecule.
[L. ligo, to bind]

ligand

(līgənd),
n 1. a molecule, ion, or group bound to the central atom of a chemical compound, such as the oxygen molecule in hemoglobin, which is bound to the central iron atom.
2. an organic molecule attached to a specific site on a surface or to a tracer element.

ligand

an organic molecule that donates the necessary electrons to form coordinate covalent bonds with metallic ions. Also, an ion or part of a molecule that specifically binds to form a complex with another molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ahmad, Synthesis, Characterization and Biological Evaluation of Transition Metal Complexes Derived from N, S Bidentate Ligands, Int.
Kepert's treatment of coordination numbers and geometrics, especially for complexes with bidentate ligands and mixed monodentate-bidentate complexes, follows his book on the same subject, and is logically placed as the second chapter.
Mixed donor atoms ligands arte subdivided into Schiff bases; amino acids, peptides, and proteins; complexones; and bidentate ligands.
The infrared spectral data exhibited that the used ligands behaving as bidentate ligands towards the metal ions.
This work describes rapid screening of chiral asymmetric oxazoline, imine, aminal and bisimine bidentate ligands and their in situ use for catalytic transfer hydrogenation of ketone in the presence of zinc.