equivalence

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e·quiv·a·lence

, equivalency (ē-kwiv'ă-lens, -len-sē),
1. The property of an element or radical of combining with or displacing, in definite and fixed proportion, another element or radical in a compound.
2. The point in a precipitin test at which antibody and antigen are present in optimal proportions.
[L. aequus, equal, + valentia, strength (valence)]

equivalence

[ikwiv′ələns]
a state of being equal in value.

e·quiv·a·lence

, equivalency (ē-kwiv'ă-lĕns, -lĕn-sē)
The property of an element or radical of combining with or displacing, in definite and fixed proportion, another element or radical in a compound.
[L. aequus, equal, + valentia, strength (valence)]

equivalence

(ē-kwĭv′ă-lĕns) [″ + valere, to be worth]
The quality of being equal in power, potency, force, value, or clinical effectiveness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, another important datum is that, while the mental model of biconditional is the same as that of conditional, the fully explicit models of biconditional are only these ones:
2005, Experiment 1) found that inferences were drawn faster from the antecedent to the consequent in the conditional ("if A, then B", "if B, then C") and in the biconditional ("if and only if A, B", "if and only if B, C"), but that inferences were drawn faster from the consequent to the antecedent in the reverse conditional ("A if B" "B if C").
that realization presupposes species-specific biconditional laws (Kim, 1981, p.
with the right-hand side of the biconditional explaining the content of the left.
For reasons comparable to those described in connection with Lukasiewicz's system, a biconditional in which either side has the truth value I will have the truth value I.
Here again he found that conjunctive, biconditional, and conditional interpretations predominated.
2) Using our biconditional, we can infer that the number of numbers would be 0.
The concept which is being reduced--the left side of the biconditional--cannot reappear on the right side of the biconditional or else the reduction is not successful.
AC and DA inferences are valid only for biconditional interpretations of conditionals that include only the two symmetric models 'A and B' and 'not-A and not-B'.
The right-hand side of that biconditional is a purely Euclidean fact.
But the ambiguous phrase concerning the relationship between Caesar and Kilpatrick as to their respective fates being biconditional events seems to displace the notion of an archetypal form.
Whether a stronger formulation is possible is an empirical issue, but a tentative assumption would be that the "dual mirroring" requirement of the last clause may provide a check on interference effects, thus allowing for a biconditional version of the principle.