bicarbonate

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Related to Bicarbonates: hydrogen carbonate, Carbides, Hco3

bicarbonate

 [bi-kahr´bon-āt]
any salt containing the HCO3 anion.
blood bicarbonate (plasma bicarbonate) the bicarbonate of the blood plasma, an important parameter of acid-base balance measured in blood gas analysis.
bicarbonate of soda sodium bicarbonate.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·car·bon·ate

(bī-kar'bon-āt),
HCO3-; the ion remaining after the first dissociation of carbonic acid; a central buffering agent in blood.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bicarbonate

A salt containing the anion HCO3-, which is the most important buffer in the blood, it is regulated by the kidney, which excretes it in excess and retains it when needed; it increases with ingestion of excess anti-acids, diuretics and steroids; it is decreased with diarrhoea, liver disease, renal disease and chemical poisoning.

Specimen
Bicarbonate is usually measured in serum as total CO2.
 
Ref range
24–26 Meq/L.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bicarbonate

HCO3 Nephrology A general term for any salt containing the anion HCO3–, which is the most important buffer in the blood; bicarbonate is regulated by the kidney, which excretes it in excess and retains it when needed; it is ↑ in ingestion of excess antiacids, diuretics, steroids; it is ↓ in diarrhea, liver disease, renal disease, chemical poisoning. See Blood gases.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bi·car·bon·ate

(bī-kahr'bŏn-āt)
The ion remaining after the first dissociation of carbonic acid; a central buffering agent in blood.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bi·car·bon·ate

(bī-kahr'bŏn-āt)
Ion remaining after first dissociation of carbonic acid; central buffering agent in blood.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
further demonstrate that the failure of pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion (i.e., a decrease of the luminal pH) can increase the risk of or lead to pancreatitis.
The duct cells lining the pancreatic duct secrete ions, fluid, and bicarbonate. A high concentration of ions causes water to enter the lumen by osmosis.
mentioned that bicarbonate plays a critical role in the viscosity of pancreatic juice.
For instance, researchers from the University of California found that most health problems stem from the deficiency of bicarbonate in today's food compared with the food of our ancestors.
The human being has only one way to recover from metabolic acidosis: to obtain extra minerals and bicarbonate to neutralize overacidity.
Metabolic acidosis in diarrhoeic neonatal calves- treatment using isosmolar sodium bicarbonate solution.
Table 1: Different therapeutic regimens Group Therapeutic / Dietary agent I Ciprofloxacin and Tinidazole (Tab C-Flox Tz (a)) Orally + ORS II Ciprofloxacin parenterally+Parenteral fluid with Sodium bicarbonate III Ciprofloxacin and Tinidazole (Tab C-Flox Tz (a)) orally + ORS + Rice bran mixed with broken barley grains IV Ciprofloxacin and Tinidazole (Tab C-Flox Tz (a)) parenterally + Parenteral fluid with sodium bicarbonate + Rice bran mixed with broken barley grains V Ciprofloxacin orally + Ciprofloxacin parenterally + Parenteral fluid with sodium bicarbonate + Rice bran mixed with broken barley grains
The results of the ANOVA also revealed a significant effect of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on plasma lactate concentration ([F.sub.(2.28)] = 17.81, p < 0.001) which only appeared in the 1st minute after exercise cessation( 13.06 vs.
Recently obtained results indicate that sodium bicarbonate supplementation can also improve 200 m freestyle performance time in elite male competitors (Lindh et al., 2008).
Of interest is the fact that similar sodium bicarbonate ingestion in adult athletes as applied in our study, raises blood pH up to 7.48, increases resting blood bicarbonate levels to 32-36 mM and maintains anaerobic glycolysis at a rate which results in plasma post exercise lactate concentrations of 22-28 mM (Gaul et al., 1995; Parry-Billings and MacLaren, 1986; Thomas et al., 2005).
While lower glycolytic capacity and the restricted reliance on high threshold motor units during intensive exercise in immature subjects (Inbar and Bar-Or, 1986) may fully account for lower LA production seen in our study, the cause of diminished plasma sodium bicarbonate concentration remains to be investigated and explained.
In conclusion, the intake of sodium bicarbonate in youth swimmers can significantly increase work capacity during short, intensive interval training.